Fukushima Fallout: The Proponents and Opponents of the Japan-India Nuclear Cooperation Agreement

Seminar/Forum

Fukushima Fallout: The Proponents and Opponents of the Japan-India Nuclear Cooperation Agreement

Yasuko Hiraoka Myer Room, Level 1
Sidney Myer Asia Centre

Map

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, where the meltdown of three nuclear reactors starting on 11 March 2011 caused one of the world's worst nuclear accidents, has had a strong impact on the global nuclear industry. Some countries, such as Germany and Vietnam, have decided to phase out nuclear power or abandon plans to construct nuclear reactors. On the other hand, some countries, such as India and China, are proceeding undeterred with their expanding nuclear programs.

It has become politically very difficult for new nuclear reactors to be constructed in Japan, so the Japanese government is attempting to open up export markets for its nuclear industry. Dr Caitlin Stronell will focus on Japan's efforts in this regard towards India.

In June 2017, the Japanese Diet approved the Japan-India Nuclear Cooperation Agreement, the first necessary step towards nuclear trade. There was strong opposition, both in Japan and India, to signing this Agreement. Dr Stronell will examine the reasons for this opposition, as well as the reasons for the intransigent stance of both governments in the face of this opposition. She will also examine what strategies anti-nuclear movements may use to prevent nuclear exports even though the Nuclear Cooperation Agreement has been enforced.

This will be the second talk in the Inagaki seminar series marking the Centenary of Japanese Language teaching.

Presenter

  • Dr Caitlin Stronell