Combatting Corruption conference speakers and abstracts

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Professor Salvatore Cincimino

Professor Salvatore Cincimino
Professor Salvatore Cincimino

Corruption as no risky business: the Italian case

Abstract

In my presentation, I discuss some economic aspects of the complex phenomenon of corruption in the public sector. After a brief introduction, I discuss the relationship between the levels of perceived corruption and the amount of public debt. I try to show how the relationship between the two mentioned variables should be redefined, or at least better argued. I also deal with some intuitive determinants of the level of perceived corruption in the countries. By analysing the case of corruption in Italy, I assess whether the determinants identified by the best theories can continue to be considered causative of public-sector corruption. Finally, I critically describe the tools, in my opinion not entirely effective, currently adopted to prevent corruption. I mention an alternative paradigm to deal effectively with the phenomenon, considering the Italian experience.

Short biography

Professor Salvatore Cincimino graduated in economics from the University of Palermo and has a doctorate in business administration from Catania University. His research includes important work on the administration of sport, including measures to improve transparency and accountability. He has also worked in the local economic development field and published critical work on the governance challenges in multi-stakeholder strategies to improve business opportunities and create jobs in southern Italy. During the past two years he has also taken the important role of President of the Orchestra Sinfonica Siciliana Foundation, Sicily’s premier music institution. In each of these fields he has confronted the need to improve integrity and effectiveness and has made important contributions to both the theory and practice of good governance.


Professor Leslie Holmes

Professor Leslie Holmes
Professor Leslie Holmes

Has there really been a "corruption eruption" since the 1990s?

Abstract

In 1995, Moisés Naím famously referred to a 'corruption eruption' around the world. In fact, specialists had only just begun to attempt to measure the scale of corruption globally, so that we cannot be certain that there really was a marked increase in corruption, as distinct from an increase in our awareness of it. However, in the two decades since Naím's claim, we have dramatically refined our techniques for measuring this type of malfeasance. In his presentation, Leslie Holmes will outline the numerous methods we now use for assessing the scale of corruption. He will also suggest why our awareness of corruption has dramatically increased since the early-1990s.

Short biography

Leslie Holmes has been a Professor of Political Science at the University of Melbourne since 1988, and was awarded the title of Professor Emeritus in 2014. He was President of the International Council for Central and East European Studies (ICCEES) 2000-2005, President of the Australasian Political Studies Association 1991-2, and President of the Australasian Association for Communist and Post-Communist Studies 2005-7. He has been a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia since 1995, and regularly teaches advanced (Masters’) courses on corruption at the University of Bologna, the Graduate School of Social Research in Warsaw, and the International Anti-Corruption Academy in Vienna. Leslie has published eight single-authored books, including Corruption: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford UP, 2015), and has edited or co-edited a further seven. His work has been translated into fourteen languages. Professor Holmes’ principal research areas are Europe and Asia, with particular reference to corruption, organised crime and human trafficking. In this context, he has been a consultant to the World Bank, Transparency International, the UNODC, the OECD, and the Swiss Government.


Mr Phil Newman

Phil Newman
Mr Phil Newman

Corruption-related reputation risk - Australia's journey and potential solutions

Abstract

Reputation gain or loss is an emerging currency in the corporate world. The strength of social media movements that may influence corporate reputation is driving many companies to change their ways. But what about nation-states? Does the same logic apply? Corruption and the strength (or not) of anti-corruption initiatives and actions is becoming a key driver of nation-state reputation. As companies look for investment opportunities in emerging markets, corruption is frequently in the top three risks to be reviewed. In Australia, what's driving our reputation for corruption? What can Australia do to regain its place as a proactive influencer and change-maker in fighting corruption?

Short biography

Phil Newman is CEO of Transparency International Australia. He joined TI Australia in January 2016 after seven years living and working in Vietnam, with three years in private sector and strategy roles with TI Vietnam. Phil has over 20 years corporate experience in the Financial Services and Banking sectors in Australia, including roles in senior management and compliance, specialising in financial and investment advice. This enables Phil to bring real-world concepts and experience into his current work in the field of anti-corruption. In Australia, Phil is focused on building coalitions against corruption with government, civil society and the private sector. Phil holds a Diploma in Financial Planning from Deakin University, Australia, a Bachelor of Arts (Social Anthropology) from Massey University in New Zealand and is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.


Mr John Fast

Mr John Fast
Mr John Fast

Practical business consequences of a disconnected world

Abstract

TBC

Short biography

John Fast, Joint Managing Director, Dragoman Pty Ltd is an economist and corporate lawyer who was previously BHPB's Chief Legal Counsel and Head of External Affairs. Before BHPB, he was the senior commercial partner specialising in Mergers and Acquisitions at the law firm Arnold Bloch Leibler. John is a former member of the Australian Government's Takeovers Panel and consults to a number of private and public companies on Governance, succession and strategy. John is also Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Rotary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Tertiary Scholarship, Chairman of NIEF Ltd, Deputy Chairman of the Norman Beischer Medical Research Foundation and a member of the Board of Investa Listed Funds Management Limited and of the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra.


Mr Kym Kelly

Mr Kym Kelly
Mr Kym Kelly

Diverting the proceeds of corruption towards anti-corruption measures

Abstract

Corrupt behaviour often causes monetary loss and usually causes loss of governance capacity. When perpetrators are brought to justice the penalty often involves some sort of fine or recovery of profits, but these sums are routinely returned to Treasury or to the consolidated account. The policy challenge is how to turn these losses and the resultant monetary penalties or recovered assets into a positive for the cheated community. Earmarking any recovered assets or fines for corruption prevention is one avenue that should be explored, but this has received very little attention. Professor Adam Graycar and I recently completed a research project for Transparency International which explored a range of comparative options around the world which might be adopted in Australia. These issues have been addressed over the past thirty or so years, not in the corruption context, but in restoring victims of crime. In many countries considerable legislative initiatives have been undertaken to compensate persons who have become victims of criminal behaviour. However, there is very little evidence of any comparable systems of compensation being directed to persons (or communities) who have been damaged or severely impacted by corruption. Similarly, there is little evidence that any recovered proceeds of crime (including crimes of corruption) have been earmarked for, or directed to anti-corruption activities. This presentation explores some of these existing broader compensation mechanisms to test whether any of these mechanisms might be adapted for victims of corruption or for anti-corruption programs, including here in Australia.

Short biography

Kym Kelly trained as a lawyer, and is a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of Australia. He worked in the public service of both Commonwealth and State governments for a total of 35 years, including 18 years at senior management level in the South Australian Attorney General’s Department. Included among the many areas he has specialised in are constitutional law, administrative law, and corporate affairs. Although he took formal retirement in 2004, he has continued to be a highly active legal consultant in a number of areas, notably anti-corruption. In this capacity, he has been a consultant to the World Bank, Transparency International, and Victoria’s Independent Broad-based Anti-Corruption Commission (IBAC). He is currently working with Prof. Adam Graycar at Flinders University on specialised aspects of anti-corruption, including methods for diverting the proceeds from corruption to anti-corruption measures.


Professor Denny Indrayana

Professor Denny Indrayana
Professor Denny Indrayana

Killing Democracy: Duitokrasi and electoral corruption in Indonesia

Abstract

The biggest challenge of Indonesia's democracy is corruption, especially electoral corruption. After Soeharto stepped down and the reformasi, Indonesian electoral laws have improved, and Indonesia is a more democratic country. However, corruption is still exists and somehow jeopardises fair elections in the country. Indonesia therefore needs further electoral reform, in particular financial reform to political parties. The parties’ dependence on financial support from a very few oligarchs is a major problem.

Short biography

Professor Denny Indrayana is an internationally recognised anti-corruption campaigner who has played a leading role in law reform efforts in Indonesia. Before being sworn in as Vice Minister of Law and Human Rights, Denny was Special Advisor for Legal Affairs, Human Rights and Anticorruption to President Yudhoyono, Chair of the Centre for the Study of Anti-Corruption at Gadjah Mada University, and Director of the Indonesian Court Monitoring NGO. Denny has a PhD from the Melbourne Law School and won the prestigious Australian Alumni Award in 2009. He has written hundreds of articles and books.


Dr Graeme Smith

Dr Graeme Smith
Dr Graeme Smith

Corruption with Chinese characteristics: Local perspectives on Xi Jinping's anti-corruption drive

Abstract

Corruption holds a peculiar fascination in China at the moment. Xi Jinping's anti-corruption drive, a "life-or-death" struggle with graft, will soon mark its fourth anniversary, confounding many (including the speaker) who anticipated that it would blow over as Party-led campaigns had in the past. Official pronouncements give no indication that the central government will let up in the near future. Nor is concern limited to Party ranks: the most recent Pew Research Centre poll in China found that over 80% of people saw "corrupt officials" as a big problem, making it the leading concern among Chinese citizens, ahead of the gap between rich and poor, and food safety. This talk will explore the changing nature of corruption in China, ask whether China's obsession with corruption is justified, and explore what impact Xi Jinping’s anti-corruption drive is having at the grassroots level.

Short biography

Graeme Smith is a senior lecturer in the Centre for Contemporary Chinese Studies at the University of Melbourne's Asia Institute. His research has explored the demand for organic produce in Chinese urban centers, the political economy of service delivery in rural China as well as the motivations of rural cadres and their impact on governance in China. He also studies Chinese outbound direct investment, aid and migration in the Asia-Pacific region. His articles appear in The China Journal, Journal of Contemporary China, Pacific Affairs, Asian Studies Review and the Journal of Peasant Studies. He is the winner of the Gordon White Prize for The Hollow State: Rural Governance in China published in the China Quarterly.


Dr Grant Walton

Dr Grant Walton
Dr Grant Walton

From despair to where? Challenges to resisting corruption in Papua New Guinea

Abstract

Anti-corruption organizations around the globe encourage citizens to report and resist corruption. Yet, somewhat surprisingly, there is still relatively little empirical research on the factors shaping citizen responses to corruption. This presentation will examine some of the key challenges citizens and activists face in resisting corruption in Papua New Guinea. It draws on a household survey with over 1800 citizens, focus groups, and ethnographic research. It shows how responses to corruption are shaped by relations of power, and examines how these relations play out within grassroots activists and communities. It argues that anti-corruption responses must be attuned to these power relations if corruption is to be meaningfully combatted.

Short biography

Dr Grant Walton is a Research Fellow for the Development Policy Centre at the Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. He is a human/political geographer who has interest in issues related to corruption, international development, civil society and the environment. Over the past decade Grant has conducted research in Papua New Guinea, Liberia and Afghanistan for international donors and non-governmental organisations. Prior to joining the Development Policy Centre Grant worked as a lecturer for the University of Melbourne, and has worked for NGOs and the U4 anti-corruption resource centre. Grant has published in academic journals and books and has authored major reports for donors and NGOs. This includes articles in Political Geography; the Journal of Development Studies; Society and Natural Resources; Asia Pacific Viewpoint; Crime, Law and Social Change; and Public Administration and Development. He is the Deputy Director (International Development) for the Transnational Research Institute on Corruption, a Research Associate of the University of Birmingham’s Developmental Leadership Program, and a University House (ANU) Early Career Academic Fellow.


Professor Jon S.T. Quah

Professor Jon S.T. Quah
Professor Jon S.T. Quah

Combating corruption in Singapore: Lessons from the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau

Abstract

Singapore is perceived as the least corrupt Asian country according to Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index in 2015 and the Political and Economic Risk Consultancy (PERC) corruption survey in 2016. Singapore's ability to minimize corruption can be attributed to the political will of its government and the effectiveness of the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB), which was established by the British colonial government in October 1952. After explaining why the CPIB's predecessor, the Anti-Corruption Branch, was ineffective, the presentation describes the CPIB's functions and total approach to enforcement and investigation before evaluating its effectiveness. The presentation concludes with four lessons that other countries can learn from Singapore’s experience in combating corruption.

Short biography

Jon S.T. Quah, PhD, is a retired Professor of Political Science at the National University of Singapore (NUS) and an anti-corruption consultant based in Singapore. At NUS, he was a Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Head of the Department of Political Science, and Coordinator of the European Studies Programme. He was a Vice-President of the Asian Association for Public Administration (2010-2012) and Co-editor of the Asian Journal of Political Science (1998-2007). He is a member of INTERPOL's Standing Committee on Ethical Matters since January 2016. He has held visiting positions at ANU, UC Berkeley, Harvard, and Stanford. He has conducted research on corruption in Asian countries since 1977 and completed many projects for Transparency International, United Nations Development Programme, and the World Bank. His books include: Editor and contributor of: The Role of the Public Bureaucracy in Policy Implementation in Five ASEAN Countries (Cambridge University Press, 2016) and Different Paths to Curbing Corruption: Lessons from Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and Singapore (Emerald, 2013); and author of: Hunting the Corrupt "Tigers" and "Flies" in China (Maryland School of Law, 2015); Minimizing Corruption in China (Maryland School of Law, 2013); Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream? (ISEAS, 2013; Emerald, 2011); Public Administration Singapore-Style (Emerald, 2010); Taiwan's Anti-Corruption Strategy (Maryland School of Law, 2010); Combating Corruption Singapore-Style (Maryland School of Law, 2007); and Curbing Corruption in Asia: A Comparative Study of Six Countries (Eastern Universities Press, 2003).


Mr David Robinson

Mr David Robinson
Mr David Robinson

In search of the perfect business model - a short history of anti-corruption agencies in Western Australia

Abstract

TBC

Short biography

David Robinson is Director of Operations at the WA Corruption and Crime Commission.







Mr Alistair Maclean

Mr Alistair Maclean
Mr Alistair Maclean

Abstract

TBC

Short biography

Alistair Maclean is CEO of the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission, the anti-corruption body for the State of Victoria.