Professor Tony Sagona has completed a five-year Anzac battlefield analysis

Professor Tony Sagona has completed a five-year Anzac battlefield analysis as a member of the Joint Historical and Archaeological Survey (JHAS)

This project was the first tri-national, interdisciplinary survey of the Anzac area using modern archaeological techniques. Its purpose was to document in a methodical manner what remains of the Anzac Battlefield a century on. Sponsored by the Department of Veterans' Affairs, Canberra, and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, New Zealand, this was a collaborative project involving the 18th March University at Çanakkale, Turkey. Members of the team include archaeologists, historians, classicists, geomatic engineers, geospatial scientists and conservators.

Over a period of five years (2010-2014), they have worked together to produce a narrative of how the battlefield, a well circumscribed piece of rugged land on the Gallipoli Peninsula, was transformed into a labyrinth of trenches, tunnels and other earthen features. Cambridge University Press will publish the results of this project in 2015 - Battlefield Gallipoli: Landscape of War and Memory. In addition, a comprehensive, web-based digital archive - Gallipoli Battlefield Archaeological Database (GBAD) - containing thousands of images and detailed data will be made available to the general public.

Mauser rifle bullet cartridge used by the Turkish Army at Gallipoli

Mauser rifle bullet cartridge used by the Turkish Army at Gallipoli

Ottoman artillery fuze tip

Ottoman artillery fuze tip

The Sphinx at Gallipoli

The Sphinx at Gallipoli

"The ridge led down to the sea in only two places - at either end of the semicircle - by the steep slopes of Plugge's [Plateau] on the right, and by a tortuous spur (afterwards known as Walker’s Ridge) on the left. Between the two, exactly in the middle of the semicircle of cliffs, there had once been a third spur, but the weather had eaten it away. Its bare gravel face stood out, for all the world like that of a Sphinx, sheer above the middle of the valley ... To the Australians from that day [25 April 1915] it was the Sphinx."

Charles Bean, The Story of Anzac, Vol. 1, Sydney, 1935, pp. 267-68