Public Lecture - Becoming Mycenaean: The Emergence of Mycenaean Civilization in Greece

Forum Theatre, North Wing, Arts West, University of Melbourne Parkville

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Emily Forster

forster.e@unimelb.edu.au

T: T: +61 3 8344 2780

Professor Emeritus James C. Wright, AAIA Visiting Professor, Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

This lecture is a survey of evidence from the Middle Bronze Age through the early phases of the Late Bronze (c. 1700-1330 BCE) and explains how Mycenaean civilization developed in relation to its predecessors.  It is intended for general audiences but will introduce them to latest thinking about the rise of Mycenaean civilization during the Late Bronze Age in Greece.  It will explore how mainlanders interacted with people in the Aegean Islands and with the in habitants of the palaces of Crete, especially Knossos. Special emphasis is placed in the rise of small warrior societies at Mycenae and elsewhere on the mainland of Greece.  The lecture will end with a consideration of Mycenaean rule at Knossos, the invention of the Mycenaean script, Linear B, and the founding of palaces on the mainland of Greece.

James C. Wright is the Director, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece as well as holding the William R. Kenan Jr. Chair at the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College Pennsylvania U.S.A. He holds his degrees from Bryn Mawr (Ph.D. and M.A.) and Haverford College (B.A.). His research interests are the pre- and proto-historic Aegean, Greek architecture and urbanism, land use and settlement, archaeological method and theory, and cultural geography; Professor Wright has conducted archaeological research in Greece since 1973, at the American School’s excavations at Ancient Corinth, the Sanctuary of Zeus at Nemea, Kommos on Crete, and since 1981 has been involved in several projects in the Nemea region. He is currently the Director of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project.

This public lecture by the Annual AAIA Visiting Professor is co-sponsored by La Trobe University, the Classical Association of Victoria and the University of Melbourne.