Conference convenors

Professor Vedi Hadiz

Professor Vedi Hadiz
Professor Vedi Hadiz

Vedi Hadiz is Professor and Convenor of Asian Studies at the Asia Institute, University of Melbourne. Before joining the Asia Institute in 2016, Vedi Hadiz was Professor of Asian Societies and Politics at Murdoch University's Asia Research Centre and Director of Murdoch University's Indonesia Research Programme. An Indonesian national, he was an Australian Research Council Future Fellow in 2010-2014. Professor Hadiz received his PhD at Murdoch University in 1996 where he was Research Fellow until he went to the National University of Singapore in 2000. At NUS, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology until returning to Murdoch in 2010.

His research interests revolve around political sociology and political economy issues, especially those related to the contradictions of development in Indonesia and Southeast Asia more broadly, and more recently, in the Middle East. Professor Hadiz has been a visiting scholar in the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS) in France, the International Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands, the Centre of Southeast Asian Studies in the University of Kyoto and the Department of Sociology in the University of Indonesia, where he is also an Adjunct Professor.

Dr Dave McRae

Dr Dave McRae
Dr Dave McRae

Dave McRae is a senior research fellow at The University of Melbourne's Asia Institute. His current research interests include contemporary Indonesian politics, Indonesian foreign policy, Australia-Indonesia relations and regional security issues. He is the author of A Few Poorly Organized Men: Interreligious Violence in Poso, Indonesia (2013) and translator of Solahudin's The Roots of Terrorism in Indonesia (2013). He writes and comments frequently in both English and Indonesian in the Australian, Indonesian and other international media. He is a co-founder and editorial board member of the Indonesia At Melbourne blog, and founder and co-host of the Talking Indonesia podcast. He is also an associate in the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society.

Dave has researched conflict, politics, democratisation and human rights issues in Indonesia for well over a decade. From 2011 until January 2014 he was Research Fellow in the East Asia Program at the Lowy Institute, covering Indonesia and Southeast Asia. As Lead Researcher for the World Bank's Conflict and Development Team in Indonesia between 2008 and 2010 he led a research program on interventions to prevent conflict and address its impacts. Prior to this, he worked for the Jakarta office of the International Crisis Group between 2004 and 2006, researching and writing reports on most of Indonesia’s major conflict areas. He wrote his PhD at the Australian National University on post-authoritarian inter-religious violence in Indonesia, explaining why civil war intensity violence could suddenly occur in a previously quiescent region.

Dr Rachael Diprose

Dr Rachael Diprose
Dr Rachael Diprose

Rachael Diprose is a Lecturer of International Development at The University of Melbourne and she teaches in executive education programs with the Melbourne School of Government. She also leads the cross-disciplinary research cluster on Conflict, Development and Justice in the School of Social and Political Sciences, and collaborates with colleagues at Melbourne, SOAS, the University of Gadjah Mada for the research project on States, Frontiers and Conflict in the Asia Pacific, which has a particular focus on Indonesia. Formerly of the University of Oxford, Department of International Development where she gained her DPhil, Rachael has led academic and applied mixed-methods research programs in a number of countries, particularly in Southeast Asia and West Africa.

Rachael's research broadly focuses on the political economy and sociology of conflict, state-building and development. In particular, her work focusses on processes of mobilisation, conflict de-escalation and conflict transformation, as well as inequalities, group dynamics and identity politics. Her work also explores the dynamics of contention in decentralisation and multi-level governance, with a particular focus on the resource and land sectors and emerging field of climate change mitigation. Rachael has a long history of working together with academics, senior policy makers, development practitioners, and civil society organisations in Indonesia and a number of countries in Asia, Africa and Europe. Her co-authored book, Contesting Development, published with Yale University Press, explores the dynamics of contention in development processes and was awarded the 2012 American Sociological Association Award for 'best new work in development'.