November

Day of the Dead

1-2 November

Day of the Dead

Mexico

Day of the Dead (Dia De Los Muertos) is a two-day holiday that reunites the living and dead. Families create ofrendas (Offerings) to honour their departed family members that have passed. These altars are decorated with bright yellow marigold flowers, photos of the departed, and the favourite foods and drinks of the one being honoured. The offerings are believed to encourage visits from the land of the dead as the departed souls hear their prayers, smell their foods and join in the celebrations! More information...


Photo: Day of the Dead Facebook

Diwali / Deepavali (Festival of Light)

4 November (date varies)

Diwali / Deepavali (Festival of Light)

Hindu / Jain / Sikh

Diwali is the five-day festival of lights, celebrated by millions of Hindus, Sikhs and Jains across the world. Diwali, which for some also coincides with harvest and new year celebrations, is a festival of new beginnings and the triumph of good over evil, and light over darkness.


In Australia, the Hindu Council hosts a yearly celebration at Parramatta Park in western Sydney. More information...


Photo: Khokarahman/Wikimedia Commons CC4.0

International Day of Elimination of Violence Against Women

25 November

International Day of Elimination of Violence Against Women

International

Women's rights activists have observed 25 November as a day against gender-based violence since 1981. This date was selected to honour the Mirabal sisters, three political activists from the Dominican Republic who were brutally murdered in 1960 by order of the country’s ruler, Rafael Trujillo (1930-1961).


The UN General Assembly have adopted a number of resolutions to pave a path towards eradicating violence against women and girls worldwide. More information...


Photo: UN Women/Flickr CC2.0

Hanukkah (Festival of Lights)

29 November - 6 December

Hanukkah (Festival of Lights)

Jewish

Also known as Chanukah, the festival commemorates the recapture and rededication by the Jewish people of the Jerusalem Temple. It lasts for eight days and nights, and each night an additional candle is lit.


Photo: Maor X/Wikimedia Commons CC4.0