Conferences

San Apollinaris in Classe, Ravenna
San Apollinaris in Classe, Ravenna
(Photograph: Andrew Stephenson)

ANNIVERSARIES, CELEBRATIONS AND COMMEMORATIONS IN THE ANCIENT WORLD AND THEIR RECEPTION

20th annual UNISA Classics Colloquium

We are pleased to announce the first call for papers for the annual UNISA Classics Colloquium, to be held in Pretoria from 15 to 18 August 2019.

The conference aims to explore issues marking celebrations, commemorations and anniversaries of all kinds around the ancient world (up to the 7th century CE, but including its reception in later periods).  Topics enlarging on the literary, social and political significance of such events in the building of not only civic identities but also individual legacies, as well as the appropriation of these occasions in later contexts, will be welcomed.

Paper proposals (approximately 300 words) are invited for papers of 30 minutes debating current issues and problems on any aspect of the above theme.  Abstracts and titles should include your name and university affiliation, and should be submitted to either:

Deadline for abstracts: 30 April 2019

Details of the conference venue, accommodation and other important information will be made available on the conference web site, which we hope to have up and running soon.

We look forward to hearing from you, and please do not hesitate to contact us at the addresses provided above if you have any queries.

EXPERIENCES OF DIS/ABILITY FROM THE LATE MIDDLE AGES TO THE MID-TWENTIETH CENTURY

Finland, 22-23 August 2019.

Conference website.

This conference aims to concentrate on the experiences of those with physical or mental impairments and chronic illnesses, with special reference to the period between the late Middle Ages and the mid-twentieth century. How were various dis/abilities lived and experienced, how did communities shape these experiences, and what similarities and changes can we detect over the course of time? An important viewpoint is also that of methodology: how can a modern scholar approach the experience of those living in the past?

The conference aims to promote dialogue between disability historians across national and chronological borders and we welcome papers presenting new research and work in progress.

Abstracts due: 15 February 2019.

MID-AMERICA MEDIEVAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE

Abstracts are invited for the 43rd Mid-America Medieval Association (MAMA) conference, “What Lies Beneath: Uncovering Structures, Subtexts, Skeletons”. The conference will take place on 14 September 2019 at the University of Missouri—Kansas City.

Plenary Speaker, Professor Kathryn Ann Smith, New York University

Papers on any aspect of medieval culture, medieval studies, and medievalism will be considered, but presentations that consider and/or (re)evaluate what lies beneath the surface of the discipline will be particularly welcome. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • discussing excavating bodies in medieval graveyards
  • the structures of medieval books
  • the subtexts of medieval legal treatises
  • the underlying assumptions about race, sex, and gender found in both medieval sources and the scholarly work of medievalists
  • the underlying influences on medieval poetry
  • the foundations of the medieval motet
  • the materials used in producing goods
  • what “lies beneath” the profession of medieval studies

Proposals for either papers (abstracts limited to 250 words) or sessions (abstracts limited to 250 words along with a list of titles and presenters) should be sent via email attachment (MS Word preferred) to Linda Mitchell: mitchellli@umkc.edu

Deadline for proposals is 25 June 2019.

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 5TH FORUM MEDIEVAL ART

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 5th Forum Medieval Art, Bern, September 18–21, 2019. The biannual colloquium is organized by the Deutsche Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V.

The theme for the 5th Forum Medieval Art is 'Peaks, Ponti & Passages'. Bern—looking out to peaks Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau, situated at the border to the Romandy, and having a long-standing tradition in bridge-building—embodies certain notions of translations, entanglements, and interactions. The conference will highlight such themes, focusing on forms and means of exchange, infrastructure, political and religious relationships, and the concrete reflections of these connections through objects. Methodological challenges will also be paramount, such as questioning how to write a history of encounters between artists, artworks, materials, and traditions.

Many mountain regions, and especially the Alps, have a long history as sites of transfers and interferences. Today, mountains and glaciers are the locations revealing most rapidly the consequences of climate change. They raise our awareness of similar changes in the past. Mountain regions were and are traversed by several ecological networks, connecting cities, regions, and countries, as well as different cultures, languages, and artistic traditions. Mountains, with their difficult passages and bridges, structured the ways through which materials and people were in touch. Bridges were strategic targets in conduct of war, evidence of applied knowledge, expression of civic representation, and custom points—both blockades and gates to the world.

Peaks in the historiography of Art History mark moments of radical change within artistic developments, the pinnacles of artistic careers, and high moments in the encounters of different traditions. Since the unfinished project of Walter Benjamin, who obtained his PhD in Bern, the passage has also been introduced as a figure of thought in historiography. The passage describes historical layers as spatial constellations, in which works of art, everyday culture, religious ideas, definitions of periods and theories of history encounter.

We invite session proposals that fit within the Peaks, Ponti & Passages theme and are relevant to Byzantine studies. Additional information about the Forum Medieval Art.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is May 30, 2018. Proposals should include:

Title
Session abstract (500 words)
Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session chair)
CV

Applicants will be notified of the status of their proposal by June 1, 2018. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session proposal to the Forum by June 8, 2018.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse will reimburse a maximum of 5 session participants (presenters and session chair) up to $300 maximum for residents of Switzerland, up to $600 maximum for EU residents, and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. In order to receive funding, session organizers and co-organizers must participate in the panel as either a participant or the session chair. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

LEGITIMACY – AEMA 14

2019 Conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association

3–5 October 2019  Monash University, Clayton, Australia

This conference invites papers on the broad theme of legitimacy.  In a modern world dominated by deeply polemical counter narratives not afraid to adjust facts to claim dominance and, thereby, legitimacy, we look at the ways in which modern forms of the pursuit of legitimacy evolved in the early Middle Ages.  Legitimacy can have several meanings, covering aspects of authenticity, legality, validity and conformity. While it literally refers to something that meets the requirements of the law, this legal aspect is not inherent: something can be legitimate without being legal, or be legal without being legitimate.

In the context of the early medieval period, who legitimated?  What were their reasons for doing so?  Conversely, what was set aside in the process of illegitimisation?  And what do these dominant and counter narratives mean for the presentation of history?  Legitimacy implies dominant views on authority, cultural legitimacy, status and control of the means to ensure dominance, such as publication.  It can create hidden communities and counter-narratives.  Even though the early medieval period continues to exist in the popular imagination as backward and insular, in many ways it is a period marked by innovations in both the practice and pursuit of legitimacy, innovations which still resonate to this day. This conference aims to challenge the perception that the modern world is particularly modern in the way it contests legitimacy.

We invite submissions on the following topics:

  • Politics and Culture
  • Individuals and Institutions
  • Law and Justice
  • Status and Inheritance
  • Authenticity and Fraud
  • Orthodoxy and Heresy
  • Truth and Propaganda
  • Dominant and Counter Narratives
  • Objects and Spaces
  • Modern (re)interpretations of the Early Medieval

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme.

We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.  Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 5 April 2019.

Limited financial assistance is available to AEMA members on acceptance.

BATHS AND SPA WATERS IN THE CULTURE AND LITERATURE OF EARLY MODERN ENGLAND

Université Clermont Auvergne (UCA), France, 11-13 October 2019

Organizers: Professor Sophie Chiari and Dr Samuel Cuisinier-Delorme

Under the aegis of the French Shakespeare Society

Keynotes:

  • Dr. Richard Kerridge (Bath Spa University)
  • Dr. Amanda Herbert (Folger Institute and Amherst College)
  • Pr. Tiffany Stern (Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham)
  • Dr. Tiffany J. Werth (UC Davis, University of California)

Water has been used for recreational or therapeutic purposes, shaping landscapes, cleansing bodies and spirits alike throughout the centuries. Cities such as Bath in England, Spa in Belgium, and Vichy in France, have prospered because of their spa activities. While balneology has frequently been studied in connection with classical Antiquity or with more recent times (in particular the nineteenth century, often seen as the Golden Age of spa activities), much work remains to be done regarding its significance in the early modern period. This conference will highlight the various uses of water in sixteenth-, seventeenth-, and eighteenth-century England, while exploring the tensions between those people who praised the curative virtues of waters and those who rejected them for their supposedly harmful effects.

During the Middle Ages, steam baths, whose purpose was more recreational than regenerative, flourished in many Christian cities. Yet the bad reputation of stews (dry or moist heated baths) was early established: over time they were increasingly regarded as places that facilitated prostitution and promiscuity. No wonder that, in Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, Vincentio describes how corruption will ‘boil and bubble / Till it o’er-run the stew’. After his ascension to the throne, Henry VIII came to regard public baths as places of debauchery in which infections and contaminations easily spread. When he developed syphilis, he ordered that the baths be closed down. As a result, in the Tudor era, they became synonymous with forbidden practices. Turkish baths, famed for their exoticism, were seen as privileged places for female eroticism, as is suggested in Thomas Washington’s translation of The Navigations, Peregrinations, and Travels Made in Turkey (1585). In the seventeenth century, many people feared that hot water could infuse their bodies with dangerous humours; they turned, domestically, to waterless grooming achieved by rubbing or wiping the skin. The habit of bathing became general relatively late, when public baths reopened in London at the end of the century, and only in the mid-1750s did bathing come back into fashion as a medical resource. Cold water was favoured since it was thought to be invigorating and to regulate blood circulation.

The early modern period marked a parallel shift in spa activities. What healing waters were thought to be differed according to faith: Catholics understood them ritualistically and superstitiously, Protestants pragmatically. The medical treatises of the period, meanwhile, no longer systematically described water as a sacred or sacramental element, examining instead its curative properties. Dr William Turner, a pioneer of spa medicine in England, drafted the first English-language treatise on hot springs called A Book of the Natures and Properties of the Baths in England and other baths in Germany and Italy. Published in 1562, the volume recorded the healing properties of spa waters for nearly a hundred diseases, compared Bath with spa towns on the continent, and pleaded for improvements to be undertaken in the English city. A few decades later, in 1626, Elizabeth Farrow discovered a spring in Scarborough. The publication in 1660 of Scarborough Spaw or A description of the Nature and Virtues of the Spaw at Scarbrough in Yorkshire by Dr Robert Wittie made Scarborough one of the most important spa resorts of the time. Wittie’s observations were extended in the second edition of the book (1667) in which he provides a description of the benefits of water on nerves and lungs as well as on mental health. According to him, water could even cure ‘hypochondriack melancholly and windiness’. While Bath, Bristol, and Harrogate were recognized as established spa towns, Scarborough’s reputation soared when spa treatments developed there and when sea water baths were introduced in addition to spring water ones.

Beyond their medical dimension, the social and cultural life of spa towns, frequently described in the literary productions of the early modern period, need examination. For example, at the beginning of the eighteenth century, Bath became a fashionable holiday destination for the English aristocracy and the upper middle classes. Queen Anne’s visit in 1702 and the arrival there of Richard ‘Beau’ Nash in 1704 turned Bath into the most elegant resort in Georgian England. Not only did people go to Bath for spa treatments, but also for entertainment: concerts, dances, card games and gambling thrived in this ‘curative’ city. The international ‘Baths and Spa Waters’ conference will be held in Vichy which, along with Bath and nine other European spa towns, has submitted a joint nomination for inclusion in a UNESCO World Heritage List of ‘Great Spas of Europe’. The symposium will take stock of current research on the connections between literature, culture, baths, and hydrotherapy in early modern England. We welcome a diversity of approaches and a wide variety of sources, such as pamphlets, poems and plays extolling, condemning or deriding baths, travel narratives that depict baths, and scientific treatises that either praise or criticize the curative use of water. Contributors are also invited to examine sources of information such as travel guides and conduct manuals that became popular in the eighteenth century, as well as newspapers and gazettes describing the activities and daily life in spa towns.

Please send your 500-word abstract along with a short biographical note to Sophie Chiari (sophie.chiari_lasserre@uca.fr) and Samuel Cuisinier-Delorme (samuel.cuisinier-elorme@uca.fr) by 15 September 2018.

Participants will be notified in November 2018.

PERTH MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE GROUP CONFERENCE

This year’s conference of the Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group and the UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies will take place on 19 October, 2019. The conference theme is Mental Health in the Medieval and Early Modern World.

Modern stereotypes abound regarding how mental health was perceived during the medieval and early modern period ranging from mental illness being caused by sin to the idea that the attainment of mental well-being could only be achieved through the balancing of the bodily humours. But mental health was a more complex and expansive subject of discourse throughout the period that was widely explored in medical treatises, religious tracts and sermons, and prominent in art and literature, which speaks to a more subtle understanding of the human mental state.

This conference aims to look at both the changing and continuing perceptions of mental health throughout the medieval and early modern period. We welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, art, and literature, but not limited to, the following broad headings:

  • Suicide
  • Marginal lives
  • Melancholy / Depression
  • Insanity / Mental disorder
  • Rapture / Ecstasy
  • Bodily humours
  • Addiction
  • Anguish
  • Therapies
  • Meditation / Mindfulness / Well-being
  • Imagination
  • Dreams / Visions / Memory
  • Criminality
  • Self-harm
  • Solitude
  • Natural / Kind / Unnatural

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to: pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2019.

For further information, see the conference flyer posted below and visit the conference website.

HOMES & HOMECOMINGS

33rd Biennial Conference of the Classical Association of South Africa, Stellenbosch 7-10 November 2019.

The Classical Association of South Africa (CASA) invites proposals for papers for its 33rd Biennial Conference, to be hosted by the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch.

We invite submissions that focus on the conference theme “Homes & Homecomings” as well as individual proposals on other aspects of the classical world and its reception. Panels are strongly encouraged and should consist of 3 to 8 related papers put together by the panel chair. We also welcome postgraduate students currently busy with Master’s or Doctoral programmes to submit papers for a “work-in-progress” parallel session.

Please submit a paper title, an abstract (approximately 300 words), and author affiliation to Annemarie de Villiers at amdev@sun.ac.za. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2019.

Further information on conference fees and accommodation to follow in due course.

Society for Late Antiquity sponsored session for the Society for Classical Studies meeting January 2–5, 2020.  Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

7TH INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM “DAYS OF JUSTINIAN I”

Special Thematic Strand for 2019: Identities

Skopje, 15-16 November, 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Professor Anthony Kaldellis

Organised by Institute of National History, Skopje, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje and University of Bologna, in partnership withFaculty of Theology St. Clement of Ohrid, Skopje, with the financial support of the Ministry of Culture and the City of Skopje

The International scientific symposium “Days of Justinian I” is an annual interdisciplinary scholarly forum aimed at the presentation of the latest research followed by discussions on various aspects of Byzantine and Medieval Studies before 1500; this includes the treatment and interpretation of cultural, historical and spiritual heritage in contemporary modern Europe. The Symposium is dedicated to Emperor Justinian I with the aim to bring together scholars from around the world to address a broad range of issues related to Byzantium and the European Middle Ages, comprising the exploration of the cultural and historical legacy as an integrative component of the diversities and commonalities of Unified Europe.

This year’s special thematic strand Identities aims to incite scholarly debate about the differing perceptions of identity in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe. Aside from the discursive evidence in the contemporary sources, modern theoretical approaches will be addressed in exploring the complex concepts and notions of identity, covering the broad range of modes of identification. Various fundamental questions will be raised in defining how identities were formed in the Middle Ages and how they were expressed, maintained, negotiated or transformed. This will encompass the ways in which Byzantium and other pre-modern states and empires have shaped and configured the composite spectrum of political, ethnic, provincial, legal, religious or cultural identities.

The symposium will embrace broader geographical areas, chronological scope, and varieties of political, ideological, cultural, social or religious contexts in exploring the multiple layers of identity in the Eastern Roman Empire and in Medieval Western Europe.

Papers are welcomed on various topics that may include, but are not limited to the following areas of discussion:

  • Romanness in the Middle Ages: Concepts and approaches
  • Being Byzantine or Roman: Interpreting the identity of Byzantium / Romania
  • Mapping ethic identities in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe
  • Imagining Identities in Middle Ages: Modern theoretical definitions
  • Strategies of identification
  • Concepts of the “Other” in the Middle Ages
  • Ethnicity, ethnogenesis and identity
  • Premodern ethnicity and national identity
  • Narrative, memory and identity
  • Language and linguistic identities
  • Art and identity
  • Material culture and identity
  • Roman law and legal identities
  • Gender and Identity
  • Heritage discourses and cultural identity
  • Religion, religious communities and identities
  • Heresy and Identity
  • Music and identity
  • Cultural heritage: Interpretation, restoration and protection

First Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 10 August, 2019.
Second Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 15 October, 2019.
Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 15 August, 2019.
Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 20 October, 2019.
Deadline for submitting the complete paper for publication: 1 March, 2020.
Please send the application form to the following address: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Presentation of the papers will be limited to 10 minutes.
Working languages: Macedonian and English.
No participation fee is required.
Travel and accommodation expenses are covered by the participants themselves.
The excursion will be covered by the organizer.
Papers delivered at the Symposium will be published in the Proceedings of the Symposium.
The papers submitted will be peer-reviewed before publication.

For further inquiries you can contact the Secretary of the Symposium, Prof. Dragan Gjalevski: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Download the call for papers.

Please check the Facebook page for news about the Symposium, the agenda, special events.

Symposiarch: Professor Mitko B. Panov

ROMANTIC STUDIES ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALASIA 2019 CONFERENCE

Proposals are invited for the the fifth biennial RSAA conference in Canberra, Australia, 21-23 November 2019. The conference theme is ‘Embodying Romanticism’.

Although the body has preoccupied literary scholarship for some time, there has been a renewed attention in Romantic studies to the complex ways in which literature encodes and reproduces our awareness of embodied experience. Challenging views of Romanticism as bounded by visionary and idealist expression, such work reflects a reorientation of criticism around the materiality of Romantic culture, whether configured as part of the age of sensibility or in relation to the era’s natural and social sciences. The Romantic period was, moreover, a time when control of the body emerged as a key political issue in workshops, homes, battlefields and colonies, when bodies were subject to rapidly evolving ideas of gender, class and race, while new bodies of knowledge and corporate political bodies emerged to regulate the affairs of nations and empires. This was a period when bodies were subject to ever more intensive modes of analysis and management, at the same time that bodies imposed their transgressive physicality through new understandings of environments, vitalism, trauma, slavery, disease and taste. Attentive to such developments, Romantic studies in turn dovetails with a broader materialist emphasis that explores how bodies are shaped in relation to affect, biopolitics, speculative realism, post-humanism and eco-criticism. Alain Badiou has recently proposed that our modern, liberal ideology can today only perceive two objects: bodies and language. Aligning itself at the conjuncture of these two terms, this conference invites papers that broadly consider how embodiment was evoked, challenged and understood in Romantic cultural life.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspects of Romanticism and embodiment. Proposals may be for individual papers or for panels of 3-4 papers.

Abstracts of approximately 250 words are due by 30 June 2019. Please send abstracts to the conference convenor, Neil Ramsey, at n.ramsey@unsw.edu.au

Postgraduate bursaries are available. See the conference website.

LATE ANTIQUE TEXTUALITIES

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

THE SPATIAL TURN IN ROMAN STUDIES

Auckland, January 22-24 2020

Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

Conference website

We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it.

The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

THE BYZANTINIST SOCIETY OF CYPRUS THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BYZANTINE AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES (CBMS)

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus (ΒΕΚ: Βυζαντινολογική Εταιρεία Κύπρου) invites papers to be presented at the Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies, to be held in Nicosia, Cyprus, 17-19 January 2020.

Honorary President: Theodoros Giagkou, Professor, University of Thessaloniki
Keynote Speaker: Enrico Zanini, Professor, Università di Siena

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the broader Mediterranean region during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German.

Scientific and Organizing Committee:
Nikolas Bakirtzis (Chair), Stavros Georgiou, Doria Nicolaou, Andriani Georgiou, Christina Kakkoura, Rania Michail, Thomas Costi, Ourania Perdiki, Despina Papacharalampous, Thanasis Koutoupas, Christina Roditou, Andreas Foulias.

Paper proposal submission material (see formatting details below):

Every paper proposal submission must be accompanied by an abstract between 300 and 500 words summarizing the presented research, report or work-in-progress and indicating its original contribution.

Please provide the requested information and submit your abstracts using our online application forms: Paper proposal

Sessions of up to five papers can be submitted together in the following form by the session organizer: Session proposal

Paper proposals will be reviewed based on their abstract and accepted on merit. This review will be anonymous. Notification of paper review will be send by email by the beginning of October, 2019. Papers will be grouped in sessions according to their topic and theme. Each participant may deliver only one paper limited to 20 minutes. Accepted paper abstracts will be published in the conference’s ‘Book of Abstracts’.

Graduate Paper Awards: The best graduate student papers will be selected and awarded upon the conclusion of the conference.

The conference is organized by the Byzantinist Society of Cyprus. Membership information.
For inquiries send email to cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy.

Paper proposal preparation instructions

When submitting your proposal through our online application form, you will be asked to provide the following information:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), email address, address, phone, title of paper, abstract.

If you encounter technical difficulties with our online application form, you may also send us your proposal via email (cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy) in the following format:

Prepare the paper proposal as a single Microsoft WORD document. Font: Times New Roman, 12 point. Line spacing: single.

Cover Sheet

Include the following information in the listed order. Please align text left and allow a blank line between each information detail:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), address, phone, email address, title of paper.

Abstract

Title line: No more than two lines. Do not use an all capital-letters title. Boldface and centered. Skip one line.

Author line: Author’s name followed by institutional affiliation in parentheses or, for independent scholars their city. No titles or degrees (i.e. Prof., Dr, PhD). Boldface and centered. Lower case, capitalize first letters of words. Skip two lines.

Abstract text: Justify text. No intend in the first line of paragraphs. Skip one line between paragraphs. Foreign language words transliterated and italicized. No footnotes or images. The abstract text is the sole responsibility of the author/s and will be included in the Book of Abstracts.

ASCS 41 (2020)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 41st Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, from 28-31 January 2020. We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Wednesday 31st July 2019.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.  ​

The conference convenor is Dr Daniel Osland, with abundant support from his colleagues at Otago. Please direct enquiries related to ASCS 41 (2020) to Daniel Osland at ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz.

The 41st ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Cam Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

EXCHANGING IDEAS: TRADE, TECHNOLOGY AND CONNECTIVITY IN PRE-ROMAN ITALY

3-5 February 2020, University of Auckland, New Zealand

This conference will explore models for the transmission of objects, ideas, production techniques, artistic styles, and other technologies in pre-Roman Italy, from the early Iron Age through the fourth century BCE. Through the presentation of innovative and dynamic approaches to trade, exchange, and connectivity, this event will emphasize both the agency of individuals in that exchange as well as the complex network of communication visible in the archaeology and history of Italy during this period.

We therefore invite proposals for papers (30min, followed by 10min for questions and discussion) on various aspects of connectivity, trade, communication, and technology in Italy from c. 900 to c. 300 BCE.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to)…

-          Networks of exchange and communication

-          The spread and/or diffusion of technology and/or artistic style

-          Control and administration of trade, technology, and communication

-          Connections and relationships between craft sites and communities, industries and workshops, artisans and elites

-          Women, families, and production

-          Movement of artisans and traders, and the role of general mobility in trade and technology

-          Local markets and international networks

Proposals should include a title and an abstract of not more than 250 words. We welcome proposals from scholars working on these issues at all stages of their careers, including graduate students and early career scholars.

Proposals should be sent to exchangingideas2020@gmail.com by 1 June 2019.

Confirmed speakers include:

Hilary Becker (Binghamton)

Seth Bernard (Toronto)

John Hopkins (NYU)

Cristiano Iaia (Newcastle/La Sapienza)

Charlotte Potts (Oxford)

Christopher Smith (St Andrews)

Marleen Termeer (Amsterdam)

Nicola Terrenato (Michigan)

Gijs Tol (Melbourne)

There will be a small registration fee to help cover catering and other costs. If you would like to attend, but not offer a paper, please also note your interest via the conference email address (exchangingideas2020@gmail.com) by 1 June 2019 and you will be sent registration information once that is available.

The conference organizers would also like to highlight that the week before this event, the University of Otago in Dunedin, NZ, will be hosting the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) Conference (27-31 January 2020). Any participants interested in attending this event, particularly if coming from the northern hemisphere, may also wish to attend the other. For more information on the ASCS conference, please contact Dr. Dan Osland (dan.osland@otago.ac.nz).

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the conference organizers: Jeremy Armstrong (js.armstrong@auckland.ac.nz), Sheira Cohen (sheiraco@umich.edu), and Aaron Rhodes-Schroder (aaron.rhodes-schroder@auckland.ac.nz).

HOW TO DO THINGS WITH EARLY MODERN WORDS: INTERDISCIPLINARY OPPORTUNITIES, DIALOGUES, PERSPECTIVES AND METHODOLOGIES

Paper and panel proposals are invited for the conference ‘How to do things with early modern words: Interdisciplinary opportunities, dialogues, perspectives and methodologies’. The conference will take place at Loughborough University, UK, 23-25 April 2020.

2020 will see the publication of the first two volumes of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Aphra Behn. Editing Aphra Behn’s remarkable oeuvre has involved the collaboration of an international and interdisciplinary team of scholars, drawing on expertise from across the humanities. ‘How to do things with early modern words’, a three-day conference to mark the 350th anniversary of the start of Behn’s public career, aims to celebrate and develop interdisciplinary approaches to early modern studies. Bringing together researchers working in all fields represented within the edition, including literature, history, theatre history, language, and digital humanities, between 1500 and 1750, the conference will explore current, cutting-edge themes, perspectives and methods in scholarship on the early modern world.

Proposals for either individual 20-minute papers or complete panels (comprising 3 or 4 papers) should be submitted to EMWords@gmail.com by 23 September 2019.

Papers which explore interdisciplinary approaches to early modern scholarship, or which address the challenges represented by digital technology, conceptual advances, or new archival discoveries (either within or across disciplines) are especially welcome. We encourage discussions of projects at initial or early stages of development for 10-minute Pecha Kucha presentations, and other formats of presentation and discussion are also invited.

55TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

The 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 7-10 May 2020 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

ROMANCE AND THE ANIMAL TURN, ICMS 2020

Conference website.

The animal turn has become hugely influential in medieval scholarship over the last decade. However, the contributions of ecofeminism and queer ecology have often been side-lined. Nevertheless, scholars are increasingly finding these modes of analysis to offer useful ways of exploring the role of the animal in medieval romance texts.

The Medieval Romance Society is hosting three sessions on romance and the animal turn at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 7-10 May 2020, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. All papers must be presented in English; however, we welcome submissions on romances from any region in the Middle Ages. We invite papers that respond to ecofeminist and queer ecological literary criticism; papers that respond to posthumanist and related philosophical theories; and papers which do not take a theoretical approach.

Session I: Romance and the Animal Turn I: Romance and Ecofeminism

This session welcomes papers looking at representations of gender, masculinity and/or femininity in relation to animals and nature in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the horse in chivalric masculinity, animal foster-mothers for human children, or gendered discourses of meat-eating. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary ecofeminist theory, although this is not required.

Session II: Romance and the Animal Turn II: Romance and Queer Ecology

This session invites papers looking at representations of sex and sexuality and/or queer identity in relation to discourses of animals and nature in romance texts. Papers might explore the role of animals in the construction of heteronormative ideologies, queer animals in romance narratives, and species panic. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary theories of queer ecology, although this is not required.

Session III: Romance and the Animal Turn III: Romance and Posthumanism

This session welcomes papers that explore discourses of human and animal identity in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the animal in ideologies of race, interspecies hybridity, and animal subjectivity in romance. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary posthumanist theory, although this is not required.

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words to Tim Wingard (tw659@york.ac.uk) by 1 September 2019.

BRUT IN NEW TROY 2020

26-29 June 2020, University of Notre Dame London Global Gateway, London, UK

Conference website.

For centuries, the “standard” version of Britain’s history held that the realm was founded by an exiled descendant of Aeneas called Brut (or Brutus), who came to the island with a band of Trojans, defeated the hostile giants living there, named it after himself, and established the capital city of New Troy, later known as London.

Popularized by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his twelfth-century History of the Kings of Britain, this matter was read, translated, supplemented, and transformed across medieval and Early Modern Europe, and across the gamut of languages and forms. The history of figures like Brut, Lear, Cordelia, Ursula, Ronwen, Arthur, Merlin, and Cadwallader catalyzed an extraordinarily long-lived, popular, and influential tradition, playing a key role in the development of Arthurian literature and English historiography right into the seventeenth century, with works running from the realm’s remote “legendary” origins to Brut continuators’ own times.

Under the auspices of the International Lawman’s Brut Society and the University of Notre Dame, this conference aims to promote fruitful conversation among scholars working on all aspects of the long historiographic, literary, and artistic Brut tradition. In the heart of New Troy, we seek to provide a forum for comparative, multilingual, cross-period, and cross-disciplinary discussion of Brut-related works and manuscripts, both canonical and less familiar, and by no means limited to “legendary” material.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on the Brut tradition from all disciplines, including medieval and Early Modern languages and literatures, and art, book, cultural, intellectual, political, religious, or any other kind of history. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The present and the renovation of the past in Brut texts
  • The role of the city in Brut texts
  • Ideas of “Britain”: nation, religion, geography, and history
  • Travel and migration in Brut texts and by its manuscripts
  • Multilingualism and the languages of the Brut tradition (Dutch, English, French, Irish, Italian, Latin, Norse, Scots, Spanish, Welsh . . . )
  • Bruts across borders (political, theological, temporal, physical, linguistic, generic . . .)
  • Medieval and post-medieval authorship, reception, and transmission of Brut texts and manuscripts
  • Bruts and technologies old and new (manuscript, print, digital media)

Please send abstracts of <300 words, with full contact information and specification of audiovisual needs, to organizers Julia Marvin and Jaclyn Rajsic at info@brutinnewtroy.com. Deadline for submissions: 15 October 2019.

This conference is made possible by generous support from the Department of English, the Medieval Institute, the Program of Liberal Studies, and the Henkels Fund, Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, College of Arts and Letters, University of Notre Dame.

WRITING ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SAME-SEX DESIRE: GOALS, METHODS, CHALLENGES

June 30-July 2 2020, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Conference website.

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies.

Derek Krueger (UNC Greensboro), Mark Masterson (Victoria University of Wellington), Nancy Rabinowitz (Hamilton College), and Shaun Tougher (Cardiff University) will be providing  plenary addresses.

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

  • essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
  • Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
  • (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
  • perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past's alterity;
  • positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don't exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson (writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com) by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include
1)      the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
2)      the general theoretical basis of the work.

This conference is underwritten by the Marsden Fund/Te Pūtea Rangahau A Marsden of the Royal Society/Te Apārangi of New Zealand.

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2020

Conference Website

The twenty-sixth International Medieval Congress will take place in Leeds from 6-9 July 2020.

MIKE CLOVER AND THE WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY

Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020.

Sponsored by the Mike Clover Memorial Consortium.

Following the untimely death of Mike Clover, a much beloved and admired scholar of Late Antiquity in general and the Vandals in particular, his students, colleagues, and friends are proposing a series of conference sessions in his honor for the Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020. Given Mike’s interests, the theme for next year’s conference, “Borders,” makes this initiative even more appropriate. We would welcome submissions on the kinds of topics that Mike liked to work on, things like barbarians/Vandals, prosopography, the Historia augusta, Ammianus, hagiography, coinage, and late Roman history in general.

Submissions can be sent to Ralph Mathisen, ralphwm@illinois.edu. The deadline for submissions in September 21. Subsequently, the wheels at the IMC will grind slow but fine, and the IMC states, “we anticipate being able to notify paper/session proposers whether their proposal has been accepted into the programme by the December prior to the IMC.”

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL AT LEEDS 2020

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6–9, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2029 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is September 3, 2019. Proposals should include:
**Title
**100-word session abstract
**Session moderator and academic affiliation
**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
**CV

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

FRANCE AND BEYOND: THE GLOBAL WORLD OF ‘NGĀTI WĪWĪ’

Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference, Auckland, 7-10 July 2020.

(Tribe ‘Oui Oui’ was the local name for the French in New Zealand.) This first ever Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference will be held in Auckland, hosted by the Universities of Auckland and Massey. Co-presidents Tracy Adams (French) and Kirsty Carpenter, and Treasurer Joe Zizek invite colleagues in History and the Humanities to engage with the themes and the visitors that the conference will bring to New Zealand.  Leading scholars from the US, UK and Europe will be keynote guests, and many American and international colleagues have already signalled their intention to attend.

The conference invites panels and papers on any aspect of French History, Medieval to Contemporary (a detailed call for papers will be circulated soon). Areas of traditional French historical research will be featured alongside popular themes: Citizenship in the Medieval and Early Modern European world; the Revolutionary period and its environmental impact in the wider Atlantic world; and changing approaches to French or Franco-British History in the NZ/Australasian and Pacific region – in what the French call Océanie.

Contacts for information:

Tracy Adams t.adams@auckland.ac.nz

Kirsty Carpenter K.Carpenter@massey.ac.nz

Joe Zizek j.zizek@auckland.ac.nz

XXVITH CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ARTHURIAN SOCIETY

It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the XXVIth Congress of the International Arthurian Society at Catania University, Italy, to be held on 19-25 July 2020.

Conference website.

The congress themes are as follows:

  • Arthurian Alterities
  • Arthurian Iconographies
  • Retelling, resumption, repeating
  • Paratexts in Arthurian manuscripts
  • Places of Arthurian emotion
  • Medievalism

Plenary Lectures:

  • Carlos Alvar (Genève)
  • Keith Busby (Wisconsin)
  • Annie Combes (Nantes)
  • Anatole Pierre Fuksas (Cassino)
  • Matthias Mayer (Wien)
  • Antonio Pioletti (Catania)

Key Dates:

Abstract submission: until 31 October 2019
Notification of applicants: 31 December 2019
Congress registration early bird: from 15 September 2019 to 30 April 2020
Congress registration standard: from 1 May to 5 July 2020
Congress: from 19 to 25 July 2020

Committees:

Local organizing committee: Eliana Creazzo, Gaetano Lalomia, Antonio Pioletti

Scientific committee: Fabrizio Cigni, Maria Colombo, Eliana Creazzo, Barbara Ferrari, Anatole Pierre Fuksas, Massimiliano Gaggero, Gaetano Lalomia, Lino Leonardi, Marisa Meneghetti, Antonio Pioletti, Arianna Punzi, Roberto Tagliani

Registration Fees:

Early Bird 100 €
Standard 120 €
PhD and independent students 50 €
Accompanying people 60 €

16TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF MEDIEVAL CANON LAW

The 16th International Congress of Medieval Canon Law, co-sponsored by ICMAC (Iuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio/International Society of Medieval Canon Law) and Saint Louis University, will take place on the university’s campus in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, from 19-25 July 2020.

These quadrennial Congresses, alternating sides of the Atlantic, constitute the premier academic conference in the field of medieval canon law. Traditionally they have drawn scholars from many countries, including not only medievalists and canonists, but also those who study related fields, such as Western jurisprudence and legal norms, Roman law, ecclesiastical and papal history, theology and biblical exegesis, manuscript studies, and the history of culture, society, and ideas.

The Academic Committee welcomes proposals for papers or sessions on any topic touching upon medieval canon law, including, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Texts and Jurisprudence
  • The Influence of the ius commune on the Western Legal Tradition and International Law
  • Canon Law and Local Ecclesiastical History
  • Canon Law, Theology, and Pastoral Care
  • Medieval Law in Comparative Perspective

The chronological focus of the Congress is typically on c. 500 – c. 1500, but select papers or sessions may also be accepted on Early Christian Canon Law and, in light of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s burning of the Corpus iuris canonici, Canon Law and the Reformation.

The Academic Committee invites proposals for individual 20-minute papers or complete sessions of four 20-minute papers. Papers may be delivered in the following languages: English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish. Scholars not presenting in English are encouraged to utilise PowerPoint presentations and/or to provide written English summaries of their papers.

Regular sessions will not feature papers on text-editing projects. Updates on critical editions or other text-editing projects will be showcased in a poster session during the Congress. Scholars who wish to present on such projects may submit two proposals if they desire, one for the text-editing poster session and another for a regular session.

For further information and submission instructions, please visit the conference website.

DAVID NICHOL SMITH SEMINAR IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES XVII

Proposals are invited for the David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XVII ‘Dark Enlightenments’, to take place 2-4 December 2020 in Adelaide, Australia.

Keynotes: Associate Professor Kate Fullager (Macquarie)
Professor Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Associate Professor Eugenia Zuroski (McMaster)

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ANZSECS), Flinders University, and the University of Adelaide invite you to the 17th David Nichol Smith (DNS) Seminar for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Inaugurated in 1966 by the National Library of Australia, the DNS is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, theology, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture.

The theme for this conference is ‘Dark Enlightenments.’ We ask delegates to consider the dark, shadowy aspects of enlightenment processes of the eighteenth century. When broadly conceived, the theme is open to numerous up-to-the-minute, interdisciplinary possibilities, including (for example):

  • the dark side of the public sphere, such as expressed in satire and polemic;
  • Empire and enlightenment;
  • critiques of empathy and humanitarianism;
  • negative emotions;
  • crime, conflict and violence;
  • the use and abuse of the past;
  • progress and ethics (political, social, scientific);
  • war;
  • romanticising death;
  • the Gothic;
  • the numinous eighteenth century;
  • the transformation of night-time;
  • developments in notions of privacy, secrecy and the hidden self;
  • the “shady” moralities of libertinism;
  • the aesthetics of darkness and light.

This, we believe, is a particularly timely theme, partly owing to the nationalist turn in global politics, and the recent controversy stirred in Australia by the proposed Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. It offers both sides of the political spectrum the opportunity to interrogate and fully understand the costs, benefits, and legacies of eighteenth-century “progress.” It is also a theme designed to emphasise the Enlightenment in its moral complexity and richness, and the wide range of domains (from the everyday to philosophical thought) that contributed to its production.

We also welcome papers for subjects that fall outside the main conference theme.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should consist of a title, 250-word abstract, and short bio sent via email as a pdf attachment to DNS2020@flinders.edu.au.

We also accept proposals for panels of three papers, which should include all the above for each presenter, a panel title, and if possible, the name and short bio of the panel chair.

Deadlines for submissions:

For early deliberation: 1 November 2019.
A first round of acceptances will be made shortly after this date to facilitate international attendance.

Final deadline: 1 March 2020

For further details, please consult the conference website.

SHAKESPEARE CIRCUITS

2021 World Shakespeare Congress, Singapore, 19-23 July 2021

The Programme Committee of the 2021 World Shakespeare Congress welcomes proposals for panels, roundtables, seminars, and workshops responding to the conference theme ‘Shakespeare Circuits’.

The trope of circuits draws attention to the passage of Shakespeare’s work between places and periods, agencies and institutions, positionalities and networks of production, languages and mediums. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Renaissance circuits: socio-cultural economies, ecologies, and performance practices
  • Transmissions: textual transfer, translation, intermediaries
  • Colonial and postcolonial Shakespeares and their intertwining
  • Shakespeare in virtual networks, computing, and the digital humanities
  • Intercultural, transnational, diasporic engagements
  • Media, intermedial and cross-platform circulations
  • Relationships among performances and texts over four centuries of afterlives
  • Tracking and tracing: quotation, allusion, echo, revision, reference
  • Circulations of identity and difference within or between plays and their appropriations
  • Failures, distortions and blockages in transmission
  • Nodal points and their relations: festivals, centres, exhibitions, venues, and archives
  • Relations conducted via Shakespeare among broader historical events, eras, or period

Submission of proposals.

The deadline for all proposals is 1 July 2019.

Please see the guidelines at WSC 2021 Programme_Proposals (downloadable PDF) for full details on submitting programme proposals.

BYZANTIUM – BRIDGE BETWEEN WORLDS

24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Istanbul, 23-28 August 2021

Due to its remarkably long duration, territorial expanse, geographical situation and complex cultural traditions, Byzantium acted as a temporal and spatial bridge connecting different periods, geographical areas, and cultures.  Byzantium acted as a transition between ancient, medieval and early modern worlds around the Mediterranean basin, Eurasia and the Near East through reception, appropriation, and innovation. It connected different geographical and cultural spaces through political, economic, material, and cultural networks in many of which it constituted an important node.  Centering on the key theme of “Byzantium – Bridge between Worlds,” the 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies aims to explore this connecting and mediatory role of Byzantium.  It also hopes to initiate proposals on bridging interdisciplinary gaps within Byzantine studies and strengthening dialogue with other relevant fields.

Important Dates

Conference Date: 23-28 August 2021
Announcement of the Plenary Session Participants: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Round Tables: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Thematic Free Communication Sessions and Participants: 15 April 2019
Call for Free Communications and Poster/VR Sessions: 15 April 2019
Period for Plenary Session Paper Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for Round Table Abstract Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for submitting Free Communication and Poster/VR Abstracts: 15 April 2019 - 15 April 2020