Conferences

San Apollinaris in Classe, Ravenna
San Apollinaris in Classe, Ravenna
(Photograph: Andrew Stephenson)

Late Antique Textualities

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together - strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridised written genres, new or hybridised elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2-5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

The Spatial Turn in Roman Studies

Auckland, January 22-24 2020

Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

Conference website

We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it.

The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header 'The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland'. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus Third International conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies (CBMS)

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus (ΒΕΚ: Βυζαντινολογική Εταιρεία Κύπρου) invites papers to be presented at the Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies, to be held in Nicosia, Cyprus, 17-19 January 2020.

Honorary President: Theodoros Giagkou, Professor, University of Thessaloniki
Keynote Speaker: Enrico Zanini, Professor, Università di Siena

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the broader Mediterranean region during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German.

Scientific and Organising Committee:
Nikolas Bakirtzis (Chair), Stavros Georgiou, Doria Nicolaou, Andriani Georgiou, Christina Kakkoura, Rania Michail, Thomas Costi, Ourania Perdiki, Despina Papacharalampous, Thanasis Koutoupas, Christina Roditou, Andreas Foulias.

Paper proposal submission material (see formatting details below):

Every paper proposal submission must be accompanied by an abstract between 300 and 500 words summarising the presented research, report or work-in-progress and indicating its original contribution.

Please provide the requested information and submit your abstracts using our online application forms: Paper proposal

Sessions of up to five papers can be submitted together in the following form by the session organiser: Session proposal

Paper proposals will be reviewed based on their abstract and accepted on merit. This review will be anonymous. Notification of paper review will be send by email by the beginning of October, 2019. Papers will be grouped in sessions according to their topic and theme. Each participant may deliver only one paper limited to 20 minutes. Accepted paper abstracts will be published in the conference’s ‘Book of Abstracts’.

Graduate Paper Awards: The best graduate student papers will be selected and awarded upon the conclusion of the conference.

The conference is organised by the Byzantinist Society of Cyprus. Membership information.
For inquiries send email to cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy.

Paper proposal preparation instructions

When submitting your proposal through our online application form, you will be asked to provide the following information:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), email address, address, phone, title of paper, abstract.

If you encounter technical difficulties with our online application form, you may also send us your proposal via email (cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy) in the following format:

Prepare the paper proposal as a single Microsoft WORD document. Font: Times New Roman, 12 point. Line spacing: single.

Cover Sheet

Include the following information in the listed order. Please align text left and allow a blank line between each information detail:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), address, phone, email address, title of paper.

Abstract

Title line: No more than two lines. Do not use an all capital-letters title. Boldface and centered. Skip one line.

Author line: Author’s name followed by institutional affiliation in parentheses or, for independent scholars their city. No titles or degrees (i.e. Prof., Dr, PhD). Boldface and centered. Lower case, capitalize first letters of words. Skip two lines.

Abstract text: Justify text. No intend in the first line of paragraphs. Skip one line between paragraphs. Foreign language words transliterated and italicized. No footnotes or images. The abstract text is the sole responsibility of the author/s and will be included in the Book of Abstracts.

ASCS 41 (2020)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 41st Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, from 28-31 January 2020. We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Wednesday 31st July 2019.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.  ​

The conference convenor is Dr Daniel Osland, with abundant support from his colleagues at Otago. Please direct enquiries related to ASCS 41 (2020) to Daniel Osland at ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz.

The 41st ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Cam Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

Exchanging Ideas: Trade, Technology and Connectivity in Pre-Roman Italy

3-5 February 2020, University of Auckland, New Zealand

This conference will explore models for the transmission of objects, ideas, production techniques, artistic styles, and other technologies in pre-Roman Italy, from the early Iron Age through the fourth century BCE. Through the presentation of innovative and dynamic approaches to trade, exchange, and connectivity, this event will emphasize both the agency of individuals in that exchange as well as the complex network of communication visible in the archaeology and history of Italy during this period.

We therefore invite proposals for papers (30min, followed by 10min for questions and discussion) on various aspects of connectivity, trade, communication, and technology in Italy from c. 900 to c. 300 BCE.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to)…

-          Networks of exchange and communication

-          The spread and/or diffusion of technology and/or artistic style

-          Control and administration of trade, technology, and communication

-          Connections and relationships between craft sites and communities, industries and workshops, artisans and elites

-          Women, families, and production

-          Movement of artisans and traders, and the role of general mobility in trade and technology

-          Local markets and international networks

Proposals should include a title and an abstract of not more than 250 words. We welcome proposals from scholars working on these issues at all stages of their careers, including graduate students and early career scholars.

Proposals should be sent to exchangingideas2020@gmail.com by 1 June 2019.

Confirmed speakers include:

Hilary Becker (Binghamton)

Seth Bernard (Toronto)

John Hopkins (NYU)

Cristiano Iaia (Newcastle/La Sapienza)

Charlotte Potts (Oxford)

Christopher Smith (St Andrews)

Marleen Termeer (Amsterdam)

Nicola Terrenato (Michigan)

Gijs Tol (Melbourne)

There will be a small registration fee to help cover catering and other costs. If you would like to attend, but not offer a paper, please also note your interest via the conference email address (exchangingideas2020@gmail.com) by 1 June 2019 and you will be sent registration information once that is available.

The conference organizers would also like to highlight that the week before this event, the University of Otago in Dunedin, NZ, will be hosting the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) Conference (27-31 January 2020). Any participants interested in attending this event, particularly if coming from the northern hemisphere, may also wish to attend the other. For more information on the ASCS conference, please contact Dr. Dan Osland (dan.osland@otago.ac.nz).

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of the conference organizers: Jeremy Armstrong (js.armstrong@auckland.ac.nz), Sheira Cohen (sheiraco@umich.edu), and Aaron Rhodes-Schroder (aaron.rhodes-schroder@auckland.ac.nz).

Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First century

20-21 February 2020, University of Adelaide

On 15 March 2019, a self-confessed white supremacist, now standing trial for terrorism and murder, is alleged to have walked into two Christchurch mosques and killed 51 people. The weapons and body armour employed in the attack contained the dates of several events in Crusading history; the manifesto of the alleged perpetrator placed his actions in an imaginary war of east-west, ongoing for a millennium. Ideas of ‘western civilisation’ implicitly situated against ‘other’ civilisations, or perhaps an absence of civilisation altogether, can be argued to have underpinned this attack. The concept of Western Civilisation, with various definitions, thus continues to be prominent in the public sphere. For some, such as the Ramsay Centre which promotes a degree in Western Civilisation, the idea continues to have social and political utility, reflecting a coherent body of knowledge, and their associated values, not least the ‘liberal’ tradition of western democracy. For others, this interpretation of European history can elide the almost continual global encounters and exchange of information that occurred, whilst denying the political uses of ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse of colonialism and imperialism.

This symposium provides a moment to reflect on the concept of Western Civilisation today, not just as a topic of historical interest but an idea that continues to hold a significant political function. What role do the histories that we write and teach play in the production of discourses of ‘western civilisation’ or resistance to it? What role do historians have in shaping ideas about the past in the present? And what responsibility do we have towards ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse? What is the future of ‘Western Civilisation’, both as taught in universities and in the public sphere?

Expressions of interest are now invited that speak to this theme from any discipline, time period or place, and any political perspective. We have a limited number of slots but are interested in proposals for 90-minute panels, roundtables or other creative contributions. We also welcome individual expressions of interest. Proposals are welcome from those at all career stages.

Please send expressions of interest to westernciv2020@gmail.com by 18 October 2019.

Postgraduate and ECR attendees will be eligible to apply for travel bursaries to present at the conference. Details of the application process will be provided soon via the conference website, but please indicate with your EoI submission if you intend to apply for this funding support.

More information.

Supported by ANZAMEMS, the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies.

Organisers: Katie Barclay, Louise D'Arcens, Clem MacIntyre, Lachlan McCarron, Amanda McVitty, Wilf Prest, Peter Sherlock, Stephanie Thomson, and Claire Walker.

Gender in Global Medieval Mysticism

Proposals are invited for the conference “Gender in Global Medieval Mysticism”, to be held 20-21 March 2020, Ashoka University, Sonipat, Haryana, India.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Professor Liz Herbert McAvoy, Swansea University
  • Professor Sa’diyya Shaikh, University of Cape Town

The French theorist Luce Irigaray has called mysticism "the only place in the history of the West in which woman speaks and acts so publicly." This capacity of mysticism to disrupt gender norms and established hierarchies - theological and political - by giving women a public voice extends across geographic regions. In a wide array of religious traditions- Judaism, Hinduism, Christianity, and Islam–pre-modern women established private relationships with the divine. In doing so, they evaded patriarchal spiritual monopolies and laid claim to their own spiritual authority. Mysticism, a spiritual experience often associated with the private and the intimate, thus emerges as a gendered political mode.

While medieval women’s mystical visions differ widely across time, space and religious tradition, we also find striking points of convergence in the ways that women mystic exemplars translate their experience of intimacy with the divine. Early twentieth-century scholarship accounted for such commonalities by presuming a single mystical experience. However, this kind of comparativism has largely been rejected. Given these shifting grounds in comparative studies of mysticism, this conference asks: What are the points of intersection that emerge within studies of mysticism at the site of gender? What kind of dialogues can be forged within and across spiritual traditions, particularly between Europe and South Asia? How might inquiries into gender and mysticism open up political dimensions of mysticism that are often subsumed within the private, and how might they inform us about the entanglement of the public and private within the frameworks of pre-modern gender in the past as well as today?

This conference invites investigations of gender and mysticism in the medieval period that focus on either South Asia or Europe or take a comparative approach. Topics might include the following:

  • Women mystics
  • Theory and mysticism
  • Men speaking as women in mystical writings
  • Gender, Politics, and Mysticism
  • Comparative mysticism
  • Mystic scribes and spiritual authority
  • Mysticism & place
  • Spiritual influence
  • Friendship/Community
  • Mystical authority and political power
  • Queer phenomenology and mysticism
  • Mysticism and the body
  • Gender and South Asian Sufi-bhakti traditions
  • Gender, material culture, and mysticism
  • Mysticism and the vernacular
  • Gender, planetary emergency, and mysticism

Paper abstracts of no more than 250 words, plus one-page CV, should be sent to Abir Bazaz at abir.bazaz@ashoka.edu.in and Alexandra Verini at alexandra.verini@ashoka.edu.in no later than 1 October 2019.

Successful speakers will be notified shortly thereafter, and online pre-registration shall be open in November. Updates regarding the conference schedule, registration and accommodation details will be posted to the conference website.

Medieval English Theatre conference

Consumption, Performance, and Early Theatre, University of Wolverhampton・Saturday 4 April 2020

Consumption involves the using up of a resource, whether through acts of imbibing or intake and acts of expenditure or through decaying or wasting away. Early performance relies on consumption, whether this takes the form of Eucharistic consumption accompanying liturgy; Eve’s sinful act of consumption that provided pretext and plot for urban biblical pageants; the use of performance to sell goods and medicines; the material goods required to create dramatic spectacle; the consumption of drink, ideas and time by spectators and performers; or the Tudor feasts that produced space for dramatic interludes. The Records of Early English Drama, with their lists of goods, payments and services, provide an archive of evidence for consumption practice. Yet acts of consumption in early drama are often fraught. Consumption is as often used to articulate doubt or mark characters and performance makers as morally dubious as it is to ensnare the senses of audiences. In a climate both preoccupied with material consumption at a global level and in which we, as researchers, theatre practitioners and teachers are frequently reminded that our labour is also consumer material, this conference seeks to examine how consumption is manifested, managed and questioned in early performance. Topics might include but are not limited to:

* The consumption of raw materials and/ or material culture in the production and performance of early drama
* Food or fasting in early performance; the morality, ethics and/or theology of consumption
* Economies of consumption in early performance
* Ritual performance and faith; inclusion and community
* Subversive consumption, over-consumption and/or consumption as a source of ‘othering’
* Consumption, spectacle and the senses
* The consumption of play manuscripts and texts
* Critical reflections on the role of consumption within modern performances and broadcasts of early drama
* Critical reflections on the role of consumption in early drama pedagogy and/or research

We invite 300-word proposals from scholars at any stage of study or career, for 20 minute papers or roundtable sessions; please submit your proposals by 1 December 2019 to Daisy Black d.black3@wlv.ac.uk

On the day before the conference (Friday, 3 April 2020) there will be a Postgraduate and Early Career Symposium organised with the Early English Drama & Performance Network; more information about this will be posted soon.

Further details and registration information will be posted soon at Medieval English Theatre.

Medieval Insular Romance Conference

The 17th Biennial Medieval Insular Romance Conference will be hosted at Durham University between 21 and 23 April 2020. Proposals for the 2020 Medieval Insular Romance conference are now warmly encouraged.

The 2020 conference will feature a plenary lecture by Professor Siân Echard (University of British Columbia) on ‘Romancing the Margins: Material Transformations of Medieval Histories’. Papers may address any aspect of romance composed in any of the languages of medieval Britain and Ireland; insular romance’s engagement with continental texts and traditions; or its post- medieval afterlives. (Please note, however, that the focus of this conference series has traditionally been on non-Arthurian, non-Chaucerian romances that have tended to receive less exposure elsewhere.) Papers addressing interactions between languages, and transformations into/away from romance works, are especially welcome, in line with Professor Echard’s plenary focus.

Proposals for 20-minute papers, complete sessions, or roundtables can be sent to Venetia Bridges (venetia.r.bridges@durham.ac.uk). Proposals should include: name, affiliation, email address, title of paper or roundtable, and an abstract of no more than 250 words.

The deadline for submitting proposals is 29 November 2019.
Any general questions regarding the conference can be addressed to Venetia Bridges at venetia.r.bridges@durham.ac.uk.

Conference website.

Generosity and Avarice in Medieval Europe

University of Nottingham, 23-24 April 2020

From the depictions of generosity and avarice in art and literature, to the interactions amongst neighbours within local communities, to the diplomatic work undertaken within and between polities, the relationship between these distinct but intertwined themes have been grappled with by medieval contemporaries and modern scholars alike. This conference aims to bring together medievalists of all fields and disciplines interested in the understanding and practice of generosity, avarice, and the relationship between the two in Europe between c. 400 and c. 1550. The committee welcomes suggestions for sessions beyond those outlined here and encourages as broad an interpretation of the theme as possible. Topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

· Patronage
· Education
· Ideas of social responsibility
· Gender roles
· Materialities
· Spirituality
· Economy and finance
· Morality
· Diplomatic relations
· Family roles
· Sexuality
· Visual and literary depictions of generosity and avarice

We welcome contributions from scholars at any stage of study or career. For individual papers of twenty minutes in length, please submit a proposal of c. 250-words. If you plan to submit a panel proposal, please include no more than three speakers and submit a c. 300-word overview of the panel with proposed speakers/respondents (and chair, if applicable) and provisional paper titles.

Please submit all proposals via email to ahxjlca@nottingham.ac.uk by Friday 13 December 2019.

Find us on twitter @Generosity2020 or visit the conference website for more information and updates.

How to do things with Early Modern words: Interdisciplinary opportunities, dialogues, perspectives and methodologies

Paper and panel proposals are invited for the conference ‘How to do things with early modern words: Interdisciplinary opportunities, dialogues, perspectives and methodologies’. The conference will take place at Loughborough University, UK, 23-25 April 2020.

2020 will see the publication of the first two volumes of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Aphra Behn. Editing Aphra Behn’s remarkable oeuvre has involved the collaboration of an international and interdisciplinary team of scholars, drawing on expertise from across the humanities. ‘How to do things with early modern words’, a three-day conference to mark the 350th anniversary of the start of Behn’s public career, aims to celebrate and develop interdisciplinary approaches to early modern studies. Bringing together researchers working in all fields represented within the edition, including literature, history, theatre history, language, and digital humanities, between 1500 and 1750, the conference will explore current, cutting-edge themes, perspectives and methods in scholarship on the early modern world.

Proposals for either individual 20-minute papers or complete panels (comprising 3 or 4 papers) should be submitted to EMWords@gmail.com by 23 September 2019.

Papers which explore interdisciplinary approaches to early modern scholarship, or which address the challenges represented by digital technology, conceptual advances, or new archival discoveries (either within or across disciplines) are especially welcome. We encourage discussions of projects at initial or early stages of development for 10-minute Pecha Kucha presentations, and other formats of presentation and discussion are also invited.

55TH International Congress on Medieval Studies

The 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 7-10 May 2020 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

Romance and the Animal Turn, ICMS 2020

Conference website.

The animal turn has become hugely influential in medieval scholarship over the last decade. However, the contributions of ecofeminism and queer ecology have often been side-lined. Nevertheless, scholars are increasingly finding these modes of analysis to offer useful ways of exploring the role of the animal in medieval romance texts.

The Medieval Romance Society is hosting three sessions on romance and the animal turn at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 7-10 May 2020, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. All papers must be presented in English; however, we welcome submissions on romances from any region in the Middle Ages. We invite papers that respond to ecofeminist and queer ecological literary criticism; papers that respond to posthumanist and related philosophical theories; and papers which do not take a theoretical approach.

Session I: Romance and the Animal Turn I: Romance and Ecofeminism

This session welcomes papers looking at representations of gender, masculinity and/or femininity in relation to animals and nature in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the horse in chivalric masculinity, animal foster-mothers for human children, or gendered discourses of meat-eating. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary ecofeminist theory, although this is not required.

Session II: Romance and the Animal Turn II: Romance and Queer Ecology

This session invites papers looking at representations of sex and sexuality and/or queer identity in relation to discourses of animals and nature in romance texts. Papers might explore the role of animals in the construction of heteronormative ideologies, queer animals in romance narratives, and species panic. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary theories of queer ecology, although this is not required.

Session III: Romance and the Animal Turn III: Romance and Posthumanism

This session welcomes papers that explore discourses of human and animal identity in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the animal in ideologies of race, interspecies hybridity, and animal subjectivity in romance. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary posthumanist theory, although this is not required.

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words to Tim Wingard (tw659@york.ac.uk) by 1 September 2019.

Canadian Society of Medievalists annual meeting

Proposals are invited for The Canadian Society of Medievalists Annual Meeting at Congress 2020, to be held 1-3 June 2020 at University of Western Ontario.

Papers for the CSM Annual Meeting can address any topic on medieval studies. Proposals for sessions of three papers are also invited. Presentations may be in either English or French. Bilingual sessions are particularly welcome.

Proposals should include a one-page abstract and a one-page curriculum vitae. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes’ reading time. Proposals for complete sessions should include this information in addition to a title and a brief explanation of the session and its format. Please indicate if the proposed session would be suitable as a joint session with another learned society. Details.

Please submit proposals for individual papers by 15 December, 2019 and proposals for sessions by 15 January, 2020 by email to Kathy Cawsey, either by regular email (kathy.cawsey@dal.ca) or via our website’s email system. You must be a member of the CSM by the time of your presentation.

Writing Health from the Eighteenth century to the Twenty-First

Proposals are invited for the conference “Writing Health from the Eighteenth Century to the Twenty-First” to be held 3-5 June 2020, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Northumbria University, in connection with a three-year Leverhulme Trust-funded major project, is organising a two-day conference focusing on writing by and about doctors and other health practitioners, encompassing everything from physicians and apothecaries to midwives and cunning women. The aim of the conference is to give scholars the opportunity to explore the phenomenon of writing doctors and its wide social effects, whether it be representations of medical practitioners in literature and art, or creative works written by medical people. The interdisciplinary nature of the subject invites work on cultural, economic and gender history, as well as literary, visual and performing arts.

  • Plenary Speakers
    Michelle Faubert, Associate Professor of English, University of Manitoba and Visiting Fellow, Northumbria University
  • Pratik Chakrabarti, Professor in the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester
  • Tita Chico, Professor of English, University of Maryland

The movement of medical writing from Latin to English in the Early Modern era opened up knowledge previously monopolised by an elite readership. Medical practitioners of both genders recognised the potential to build up their brand by catering to a burgeoning market of eager new readers. Publishers and booksellers capitalised on increased literary rates and greater purchasing powers amongst the public to produce ever-growing quantities of scientific texts – further fuelling public fascination with health and wellbeing, especially that of women. Practitioners, in entering this marketplace, were laid increasingly open to public ownership, as a personality behind the prose, either for better or worse. The full social, economic and political implications of this radical shift in the dissemination of information in the medical field have only just begun to be uncovered by scholars. This conference aims to open up discussion regarding all elements of this topic ca. 1660 to the present day.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Representation of, and writing by, medical practitioners in literary, visual and performing arts
  • Medical self-fashioning
  • The role of gender in medicine (eg female apothecaries, midwives, cunning women, etc.)
  • Definitions of medical writing and the role of genre
  • European, Trans-Atlantic, Asian, and colonial medicine
  • Satire - in all its forms - directed at medical practice, both lay and professional, including by medical people themselves
  • Discourse and correspondence between practitioners, and practitioners and their patients
  • The nature of medical publishing

We welcome proposals from researchers across a range of disciplines and stages of career, including early career and student scholars. Please send proposals of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a short biography, to writingdocs18@gmail.com by 15 November 2019. Papers will be invited on a wide variety of relevant topics from within the period. A selection of revised papers is expected to be published as part of the project outputs.

The Reception of Plato in Later Antiquity and the Middle Ages

We are delighted to announce a 2-day conference, organized by the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in collaboration with the Australian Research Council and Macquarie University, Australia

The conference will take place at the University of Athens, 8-9 June 2020.

We have collaborated with the ISNS conference organisers so to facilitate the participation of local and international delegates to both events, but please note that the two events are run independently. News about our conference.

Our Approach:

Taking start from our common interest in the Platonic tradition and its reception in later periods, our collaboration has to date yielded one edited volume (The Neoplatonists and their Heirs, Brill, 2020, ed. Ken Parry and E. Anagnostou-Laoutides), while a second one is anticipated to host select papers from the conference. We now wish to expand our network of co-thinkers and thus, we welcome papers on any aspect of Platonic reception, both in the Byzantine East and the Latin West, in philosophical, literary and/or theological texts. Confirmed Speakers include (in alphabetical order):

-Prof Dirk Baltzly (University of Tasmania)

-Prof Kevin Corrigan (Emory University)

-Prof Lloyd Gerson (Toronto University)

-Prof Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University/ “Angelicum” University/ Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan)

Please send abstracts of circa 300 words to the conference organisers by 15 December 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by 15 January 2020.

Our emails are: Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au; G.Steiris@ppp.uoa.gr; garabatz@ppp.uoa.gr

We look forward to receiving your contributions,

Sincerely,

Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (MQ) - George Steiris (UoA) - George Arabatzis (UoA)

Sailing with the Gods: Religion and Maritime Mobility in the Ancient World

Sponsored by: The Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions
Location: Grand Hotel Excelsior, Floriana, Malta
Dates: June 17-21, 2020

Ritual practices dedicated to maritime success appear across a wide span of human cultural history, from the Mediterranean to the North Sea, Southeast Asia across the Pacific to the west coast of the Americas. Culturally-constructed seafaring rituals could be seen as spiritual or superstitious, and respond to the combination of risk and profit endemic in even short voyages by water. Maritime religion infuses all water-borne contact across cultural boundaries; the crafts of those who build rafts, canoes, and sailing vessels; navigational skills which may reach back to ancestors who have faded into cultural legend; and myriad mnemonic and naming strategies extending to littoral markers and celestial patterns. Mythic and ritual responses are accordingly complex, ranging from apotropaia to the divine authorisation of civic structures, shipboard shrines and functional epithets which could link divinities, heroes and nearly-deified rulers to the control of the waves and winds.

Studies of religion and maritime mobility are often framed within individual cultural contexts, but this international conference seeks to bring together scholars from across a range of disciplines and historical periods, from prehistoric to the seventh century CE, to address critical questions in method and theory relevant to religion in the context of maritime mobility. Among these questions are:

Abstracts should be submitted by email attachment as .doc or .docx files to socamr@gmail.com and should be from 500-600 words in length for a paper to last between 25 to 30 minutes. Abstracts should contain a title and a word count, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is January 1, 2020, and all abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. Please direct all queries to SAMR at socamr@gmail.com. The organisers of the conference are Sandra Blakely (Emory) and Amelia Brown (UQ).

Register for the conference and see schedules as they develop.

Brut in New Troy 2020

26-29 June 2020, University of Notre Dame London Global Gateway, London, UK

Conference website.

For centuries, the “standard” version of Britain’s history held that the realm was founded by an exiled descendant of Aeneas called Brut (or Brutus), who came to the island with a band of Trojans, defeated the hostile giants living there, named it after himself, and established the capital city of New Troy, later known as London.

Popularised by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his twelfth-century History of the Kings of Britain, this matter was read, translated, supplemented, and transformed across medieval and Early Modern Europe, and across the gamut of languages and forms. The history of figures like Brut, Lear, Cordelia, Ursula, Ronwen, Arthur, Merlin, and Cadwallader catalysed an extraordinarily long-lived, popular, and influential tradition, playing a key role in the development of Arthurian literature and English historiography right into the seventeenth century, with works running from the realm’s remote “legendary” origins to Brut continuators’ own times.

Under the auspices of the International Lawman’s Brut Society and the University of Notre Dame, this conference aims to promote fruitful conversation among scholars working on all aspects of the long historiographic, literary, and artistic Brut tradition. In the heart of New Troy, we seek to provide a forum for comparative, multilingual, cross-period, and cross-disciplinary discussion of Brut-related works and manuscripts, both canonical and less familiar, and by no means limited to “legendary” material.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on the Brut tradition from all disciplines, including medieval and Early Modern languages and literatures, and art, book, cultural, intellectual, political, religious, or any other kind of history. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The present and the renovation of the past in Brut texts
  • The role of the city in Brut texts
  • Ideas of "Britain": nation, religion, geography, and history
  • Travel and migration in Brut texts and by its manuscripts
  • Multilingualism and the languages of the Brut tradition (Dutch, English, French, Irish, Italian, Latin, Norse, Scots, Spanish, Welsh ... )
  • Bruts across borders (political, theological, temporal, physical, linguistic, generic ...)
  • Medieval and post-medieval authorship, reception, and transmission of Brut texts and manuscripts
  • Bruts and technologies old and new (manuscript, print, digital media)

Please send abstracts of <300 words, with full contact information and specification of audiovisual needs, to organisers Julia Marvin and Jaclyn Rajsic at info@brutinnewtroy.com. Deadline for submissions: 15 October 2019.

This conference is made possible by generous support from the Department of English, the Medieval Institute, the Program of Liberal Studies, and the Henkels Fund, Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, College of Arts and Letters, University of Notre Dame.

Writing Ancient and Medieval Same-sex desire: goals, methods, challenges

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies. See the conference website for more.

Derek Krueger (UNC Greensboro), Mark Masterson (Victoria University of Wellington), Nancy Rabinowitz (Hamilton College), and Shaun Tougher (Cardiff University) will be providing plenary addresses.

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

  • essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
  • Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
  • (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
  • perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past’s alterity;
  • positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don’t exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson (writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com) by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include:

  • the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
  • the general theoretical basis of the work

This conference is underwritten by the Marsden Fund/Te Pūtea Rangahau A Marsden of the Royal Society/Te Apārangi of New Zealand.

Medieval and Renaissance Music conference

The organisers and the Programme Committee invite proposals for the 2020 Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference to be held in Edinburgh on 1-4 July 2020.

Proposals on all topics relating to Medieval and Renaissance Music, broadly construed, are welcomed, but we are particularly interested in the following areas: Music in Britain; Chant; Gender and music; Music and medievalism; Music and the environment; Music outside of continental Europe; Early Music and Digital Technologies; The state of the discipline

Conference languages: English, French, German, Italian, Spanish

Possible formats of presentations include, but are not limited to:
* individual papers of 20 minutes
* paired papers
* themed sessions
* round tables
* workshops/ lecture-recitals
* posters
The conference will include a dedicated poster session.

Please send proposals to medren2020@gmail.com by 31 December. Notification of acceptance will be given by February 14th. Proposals should include:
·        Title of paper
·        Speaker(s)
·        Affiliation
·        A proposal of c.250 words
For themed sessions:
* title of paper
* chair (if known)
* names of all participants
* total required duration (blocks of 90 minutes are preferred)
* short description of contents

Registration will go live on February 1 2020.

Programme Committee:
* James Cook
* Marianne Gillion
* Thomas Schmidt
* Adam Whittaker
* Miriam Wendling
* Raquel Rojo Carillo,
* Tess Knighton,
* Elisabeth Giselbrecht
* Victori Coelho
* Catherine Bradly
* Antonio Chemotti

Pfaff at Fifty: New devotions and religious change in later Medieval England

Conference website.

Originally published in 1970, Richard W. Pfaff's New Liturgical Feasts in Later Medieval England fundamentally changed the way humanities scholars thought and wrote about English religious development in the long fifteenth century. Pfaff asked important questions about the process by which the new devotions that focused on Christ and the Virgin entered the liturgy in England and how a liturgical feast was 'promulgated - at all the levels to make it effective - or accepted'. Moreover, he emphasised the gradual pace of liturgical change and its different stages.

Pfaff explored the relationship between liturgical and extra-liturgical devotions; demonstrated the variation in the pace and extent of regional, local and institutional change; and promoted the idea of the push and pull of popular demand for change in place of the traditional notion of official promulgation from above. Most importantly, even though he was a liturgical scholar with deep, specialised knowledge of the material evidence and an intense insight into the practice of the period, Pfaff opened study of the cultural impact of these devotions to scholars of many adjacent fields. It is in honour of this wide sowing that we now gather, fifty years  on, to reap and to share.

New Liturgical Feasts documented a process of increased elaboration and enhancement in  fifteenth-century English liturgy that would have profoundly impacted the experience of church-going parishioners throughout the realm. Pfaff saw this as evidence of 'liturgical vitality' rather than of 'an over-complicated and decadent system which was shortly to collapse through its own burdensomeness' (p. 131). He called for scholars interested in ‘the whole of later medieval spirituality’ to consider both private devotion and 'what goes on in the church' (p. 132).

In the five decades since 1970, we have witnessed a very considerable flourishing of research - conducted across many disciplines - on a wide range of aspects of late medieval religious life. These include, among others, lay piety, the importance of gender in shaping religious belief and practice, religious observance in parish and cathedral churches, the religious orders, saints’ cults, mysticism, devotional reading, the material culture of religion, and heterodoxy and heresy. Pfaff's pioneering study opened new pathways and provided a new impetus for scholars to explore religious culture as a whole in all its variety. As a result, fifty years after NLF’s publication, we have a much greater appreciation of the vitality, as well as the complexity, of late medieval religion.

'Pfaff at Fifty' will take place at the University of Nottingham, 2-3 July 2020. The conference aims to take stock of the enduring legacy of New Liturgical Feasts by reconsidering the important questions that this touchstone book raised. We invite abstracts that address the themes,  questions, and implications of Pfaff’s book in the light of new research. We encourage submissions from scholars working in any relevant discipline or field, including history, theology, art history, literary studies, archaeology, gender studies, musicology, and manuscript studies.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short biographical note to either of the email addresses listed below by 1 October 2019.

Dr Benjamin Barootes
Pontifical Institute of Mediæval Studies, Toronto

Dr Rob Lutton
University of Nottingham

International Medieval Congress 2020

Conference Website

The twenty-sixth International Medieval Congress will take place in Leeds from 6-9 July 2020.

Writing Identity in Liminal Spaces, IMC Leeds 2020

The Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol, and the Medieval and Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney, will be sponsoring a series of three panels at IMC Leeds 2020.

The aim of the panels is to explore aspects of identity in multilingual and multicultural border zones, and how border identities are imagined and represented in different literary and historical genres of medieval writing. Each panel will focus on a key genre in which formations of identity in border contexts are central to the textual strategies of the genre. A wide range of critical approaches is encouraged, including, but not limited to, eco-criticism, cultural geography, gender theory, book history, historiography, literary criticism, linguistics, postcolonial theory.

We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from all disciplines, and relating to all languages/nations of the medieval world. Proposals from postgraduates and early-career scholars are particularly welcome.

Abstracts of up to 200 words can be sent to: Helen Fulton (helen.fulton@bristol.ac.uk) or Jan Shaw (jan.shaw@sydney.edu.au) by Monday 9 September 2019. Please include your name and full contact details, including institutional address, and any AV equipment you are likely to need.

Queens on the Threshold, IMC Leeds 2020

The organisers invite paper proposals for panels at the 2020 Leeds International Medieval Congress on the theme ‘Queens on the Threshold’.

Often, we see medieval queens in movement: between families, between lands, between status, between the lines.
This strand seeks to think with and through the theme of ‘borders’, to consider how medieval queenship (understood in broad terms) operates and is set in motion by queens themselves and those around them. We hope this strand will engage with the multiple movements of queens in texts, images, and artefacts.

We welcome submissions from all periods and geographical areas.

Potential topics include but not are limited to:

  • liminal events (inauguration ceremonies, weddings, funerals, succession crises)
  • physical and geographical crossing of limits (international alliances, networks of communication and gift-exchange)
  • visual signs of 'foreignness' (heraldry, fashion, religious symbols)
  • failed crossings (unsuccessful marriage agreements, repudiation or divorce, early death)
    unstable personas or models (the virago, the concubine)

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words (.pdf or .docx preferred) and short bio to Florence H. R. Scott and Juliana Amorim Goskes (queenlythreshold@gmail.com) by 15 September, 2019. Questions can also be addressed to the same e-mail.

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Gendered Landscapes, IMC Leeds 2020

The organisers invite paper proposals for the 2020 Leeds International Congress Leeds on the theme of ‘Beyond ‘Virgin’ Lands: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Gendered Landscapes’.

Interactions with the medieval landscape often appear as innately masculine. From Brutus’ foundation of the eponymous Britain to patrilineages derived from castle names to metaphorically feminine (virginal and untamed) lands awaiting male domination. Yet, as recent research shows, the apparent prevalence of these ‘fantasies’ in medieval sources is due in part to modern assumptions. In fact, historical women built castles and were patrons of monasteries, the legendary Syrian princess Albina gave her name to Albion before Brutus ever landed, female saints impressed their footprints permanently into rock and the menstrual blood of Queen Medh carved furrows into the Irish landscape. In symbolic, nominal, architectural, horticultural and legal ways, to name a few, medieval women shaped, curated and cared for the medieval landscape. Then as now, the landscape is a cultural construct: the ways we understand it have much to do with the gendered preconceptions and approaches we bring to our study and the sources and interactions we privilege.

These interdisciplinary panel(s) will explore the ways women, other gendered identities and non-human agents, both historical and representational, took control of and shaped geographical landscapes at a variety of scales. We are particularly interested in papers that move beyond artificial borders between male/female, nature/culture, domestic/political and other oppositional understandings. Questions may include but are not limited to:

  • How did women's political, communal and private interests influence the ways medieval people understood their contemporary landscapes? To what extent did legends and landmarks left by women shape future notions of the land’s identity?
  • In what ways did women’s devotional practices draw on landscapes at both micro and macro levels? What haptic, emotional, affective experiences can we understand from today?
  • What impact do masculine and paternalistic narratives have within the current discourses on medieval landscapes, particularly in heritage studies?
  • What can we as scholars do to understand the diversity of class, gender, religious, racial and cultural positions always at play within the medieval landscape? How does eco-criticism and new materialism help in this study?

We hope these will be truly interdisciplinary discussions and welcome papers from all fields, including anthropology, archaeology, heritage studies, history, art history, literature and religion on any medieval period and geographical region.

Please submit an abstract of 150-200 words to Emma Bérat emmaberat84@gmail.com and Karen Dempsey k.dempsey@reading.ac.uk by 15 September 2019.

Mike Clover and the World of Late Antiquity

Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020.

Sponsored by the Mike Clover Memorial Consortium.

Following the untimely death of Mike Clover, a much beloved and admired scholar of Late Antiquity in general and the Vandals in particular, his students, colleagues, and friends are proposing a series of conference sessions in his honor for the Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020. Given Mike's interests, the theme for next year's conference, "Borders," makes this initiative even more appropriate. We would welcome submissions on the kinds of topics that Mike liked to work on, things like barbarians/Vandals, prosopography, the Historia augusta, Ammianus, hagiography, coinage, and late Roman history in general.

Submissions can be sent to Ralph Mathisen, ralphwm@illinois.edu. The deadline for submissions in September 21. Subsequently, the wheels at the IMC will grind slow but fine, and the IMC states, “we anticipate being able to notify paper/session proposers whether their proposal has been accepted into the programme by the December prior to the IMC.”

Mary Jaharis Center sponsored panel at Leeds 2020

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6-9, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2029 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is September 3, 2019. Proposals should include:
**Title
**100-word session abstract
**Session moderator and academic affiliation
**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
**CV

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organiser informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organiser may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Images of early Rome

The thirty-fourth meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at Boston University from 10 to 12 July 2020. The theme for the 2020 conference will be "Images of Early Rome."

Papers are invited to explore different depictions of the figures of early Rome in Latin literature; Aeneas, Ilia, Romulus and Remus, the Sabine Women, Lucretia, etc. How do the iterations of these figures reflect (or problematize) political and literary attitudes in Rome? And what does the continued presence of these early figures in the works of successive literary generations tell us about the enduring nature of these Roman "myths"? We also invite papers on the reception of early Rome in any medium, from Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece (1594), to Ursula K. Le Guin's Lavinia (2008), to Matteo Rovere's Il Primo Re (2019).

Papers should be 30 minutes in length (with fifteen minutes of discussion time). The Pacific Rim Seminar does not run parallel sessions; participants can attend any or all papers. Abstract proposals of 200-300 words, and queries about the conference, should be sent to the organizer, Hannah Čulík-Baird, at culik@bu.edu. Submissions from graduate students and early-career researchers are welcome. Please have abstracts submitted by 15th January 2020 (earlier submissions welcome).

Further details about accommodations, dining, and tourism in Boston during the Pac Rim will be posted on this blog after the finalization of the schedule.

France and Beyond: The Global World of 'Ngāti Wīwī'

Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference, Auckland, 7-10 July 2020.

(Tribe 'Oui Oui' was the local name for the French in New Zealand.) This first ever Joint George Rudé Seminar and the Society for French Historical Studies Conference will be held in Auckland, hosted by the Universities of Auckland and Massey. Co-presidents Tracy Adams (French) and Kirsty Carpenter, and Treasurer Joe Zizek invite colleagues in History and the Humanities to engage with the themes and the visitors that the conference will bring to New Zealand. Leading scholars from the US, UK and Europe will be keynote guests, and many American and international colleagues have already signalled their intention to attend.

The conference invites panels and papers on any aspect of French History, Medieval to Contemporary (a detailed call for papers will be circulated soon). Areas of traditional French historical research will be featured alongside popular themes: Citizenship in the Medieval and Early Modern European world; the Revolutionary period and its environmental impact in the wider Atlantic world; and changing approaches to French or Franco-British History in the NZ/Australasian and Pacific region - in what the French call Océanie.

Contacts for information:

Tracy Adams t.adams@auckland.ac.nz

Kirsty Carpenter K.Carpenter@massey.ac.nz

Joe Zizek j.zizek@auckland.ac.nz

Images of Early Rome

XXVITH Congress of the International Arthurian Society

It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the XXVIth Congress of the International Arthurian Society at Catania University, Italy, to be held on 19-25 July 2020.

Conference website.

The congress themes are as follows:

  • Arthurian Alterities
  • Arthurian Iconographies
  • Retelling, resumption, repeating
  • Paratexts in Arthurian manuscripts
  • Places of Arthurian emotion
  • Medievalism

Plenary lectures

  • Carlos Alvar (Genève)
  • Keith Busby (Wisconsin)
  • Annie Combes (Nantes)
  • Anatole Pierre Fuksas (Cassino)
  • Matthias Mayer (Wien)
  • Antonio Pioletti (Catania)

Key dates

Abstract submission: until 31 October 2019
Notification of applicants: 31 December 2019
Congress registration early bird: from 15 September 2019 to 30 April 2020
Congress registration standard: from 1 May to 5 July 2020
Congress: from 19 to 25 July 2020

Committees

Local organising committee: Eliana Creazzo, Gaetano Lalomia, Antonio Pioletti

Scientific committee: Fabrizio Cigni, Maria Colombo, Eliana Creazzo, Barbara Ferrari, Anatole Pierre Fuksas, Massimiliano Gaggero, Gaetano Lalomia, Lino Leonardi, Marisa Meneghetti, Antonio Pioletti, Arianna Punzi, Roberto Tagliani

Registration fees

Early Bird 100 €
Standard 120 €
PhD and independent students 50 €
Accompanying people 60 €

16th International Congress of Medieval Canon Law

The 16th International Congress of Medieval Canon Law, co-sponsored by ICMAC (Iuris Canonici Medii Aevi Consociatio/International Society of Medieval Canon Law) and Saint Louis University, will take place on the university's campus in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, from 19-25 July 2020.

These quadrennial Congresses, alternating sides of the Atlantic, constitute the premier academic conference in the field of medieval canon law. Traditionally they have drawn scholars from many countries, including not only medievalists and canonists, but also those who study related fields, such as Western jurisprudence and legal norms, Roman law, ecclesiastical and papal history, theology and biblical exegesis, manuscript studies, and the history of culture, society, and ideas.

The Academic Committee welcomes proposals for papers or sessions on any topic touching upon medieval canon law, including, but not limited to, the following themes:

  • Texts and Jurisprudence
  • The Influence of the ius commune on the Western Legal Tradition and International Law
  • Canon Law and Local Ecclesiastical History
  • Canon Law, Theology, and Pastoral Care
  • Medieval Law in Comparative Perspective

The chronological focus of the Congress is typically on c. 500 - c. 1500, but select papers or sessions may also be accepted on Early Christian Canon Law and, in light of the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s burning of the Corpus iuris canonici, Canon Law and the Reformation.

The Academic Committee invites proposals for individual 20-minute papers or complete sessions of four 20-minute papers. Papers may be delivered in the following languages: English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish. Scholars not presenting in English are encouraged to utilise PowerPoint presentations and/or to provide written English summaries of their papers.

Regular sessions will not feature papers on text-editing projects. Updates on critical editions or other text-editing projects will be showcased in a poster session during the Congress. Scholars who wish to present on such projects may submit two proposals if they desire, one for the text-editing poster session and another for a regular session.

For further information and submission instructions, please visit the conference website.

Masculinities in the Premodern World

Proposals are invited for the conference "Masculinities in the Premodern World: Continuities, Change, and Contradictions" to be held 13-15 November 2020 at the University of Toronto, Canada.

The past twenty-five years have witnessed a burgeoning of studies on sexuality and gender in the premodern world. In particular, men and masculinities have received considerable attention. Building on the theoretical perspectives provided by feminism, Foucault, and cultural studies, the study of men and masculinities is increasingly theoretically inflected and sophisticated. Studies have encompassed questions pertaining to men of various social statuses, secular and ecclesiastical, as portrayed in historical, literary, philosophical, theological, and art historical sources among others.

This conference aims to locate the study of premodern men and masculinities in its current richness and complexity. Our plenary speakers will be two of the most important scholars in the area of medieval/early modern masculinities: Patricia Simons (University of Michigan) and Patricia Cullum (University of Huddersfield, UK).

Papers are invited on all areas of study across the premodern world (500 to 1650 CE), crossing Europe's religious and linguistic diversity, and encompassing its geographical breadth and beyond. Topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • concepts of virility
  • patriarchy, marriage, fatherhood and procreative masculinities
  • social and political perspectives
  • medical and biological perceptions
  • celibacy, chastity, continence
  • monastic and clerical masculinity
  • sexual function and dysfunction
  • queer and non-binary masculinities
  • typologies of premodern men
  • masculinity and physical prowess; sports and athletics
  • depictions of masculinity in literature and the arts

Proposals are invited for individual papers, panels, roundtables, and alternatives to traditional academic presentation models.

To submit a proposal, please include: speaker’s name and academic affiliation (or “independent scholar” as applicable); the title of the presentation; a 150-word abstract; full contact information (mailing address, telephone, email); and a one-page CV. In the case of proposals for complete sessions, this information must be provided for each presenter and the chair (if proposed).

Proposals should be emailed in Word format to both conference organizers:
Prof. Jacqueline Murray jacqueline.murray@uoguelph.ca
Prof. Konrad Eisenbichler at konrad.eisenbichler@utoronto.ca

Deadline for submission: 15 November 2019

David Nichol Smith seminar In Eighteenth-century studies XVII

Proposals are invited for the David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XVII ‘Dark Enlightenments’, to take place 2-4 December 2020 in Adelaide, Australia.

Keynotes

Associate Professor Kate Fullager (Macquarie)
Professor Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Associate Professor Eugenia Zuroski (McMaster)

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ANZSECS), Flinders University, and the University of Adelaide invite you to the 17th David Nichol Smith (DNS) Seminar for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Inaugurated in 1966 by the National Library of Australia, the DNS is the leading forum for eighteenth-century studies in Australasia. It brings together scholars from across the region and internationally who work on the long eighteenth century in a range of disciplines, including history, literature, art and architectural history, philosophy, theology, the history of science, musicology, anthropology, archaeology and studies of material culture.

The theme for this conference is 'Dark Enlightenments'. We ask delegates to consider the dark, shadowy aspects of enlightenment processes of the eighteenth century. When broadly conceived, the theme is open to numerous up-to-the-minute, interdisciplinary possibilities, including (for example):

  • the dark side of the public sphere, such as expressed in satire and polemic
  • Empire and enlightenment
  • critiques of empathy and humanitarianism
  • negative emotions
  • crime, conflict and violence
  • the use and abuse of the past
  • progress and ethics (political, social, scientific)
  • war
  • romanticising death
  • the Gothic
  • the numinous eighteenth century
  • the transformation of night-time
  • developments in notions of privacy, secrecy and the hidden self
  • the “shady” moralities of libertinism
  • the aesthetics of darkness and light

This, we believe, is a particularly timely theme, partly owing to the nationalist turn in global politics, and the recent controversy stirred in Australia by the proposed Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. It offers both sides of the political spectrum the opportunity to interrogate and fully understand the costs, benefits, and legacies of eighteenth-century “progress.” It is also a theme designed to emphasise the Enlightenment in its moral complexity and richness, and the wide range of domains (from the everyday to philosophical thought) that contributed to its production.

We also welcome papers for subjects that fall outside the main conference theme.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should consist of a title, 250-word abstract, and short bio sent via email as a pdf attachment to DNS2020@flinders.edu.au.

We also accept proposals for panels of three papers, which should include all the above for each presenter, a panel title, and if possible, the name and short bio of the panel chair.

Deadlines for submissions

For early deliberation: 1 November 2019.
A first round of acceptances will be made shortly after this date to facilitate international attendance.

Final deadline: 1 March 2020

For further details, please consult the conference website.

Shakespeare Circuits

2021 World Shakespeare Congress, Singapore, 19-23 July 2021

The Programme Committee of the 2021 World Shakespeare Congress welcomes proposals for panels, roundtables, seminars, and workshops responding to the conference theme 'Shakespeare Circuits'.

The trope of circuits draws attention to the passage of Shakespeare's work between places and periods, agencies and institutions, positionalities and networks of production, languages and mediums. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

  • Renaissance circuits: socio-cultural economies, ecologies, and performance practices
  • Transmissions: textual transfer, translation, intermediaries
  • Colonial and postcolonial Shakespeares and their intertwining
  • Shakespeare in virtual networks, computing, and the digital humanities
  • Intercultural, transnational, diasporic engagements
  • Media, intermedial and cross-platform circulations
  • Relationships among performances and texts over four centuries of afterlives
  • Tracking and tracing: quotation, allusion, echo, revision, reference
  • Circulations of identity and difference within or between plays and their appropriations
  • Failures, distortions and blockages in transmission
  • Nodal points and their relations: festivals, centres, exhibitions, venues, and archives
  • Relations conducted via Shakespeare among broader historical events, eras, or period

Submission of proposals.

The deadline for all proposals is 1 July 2019.

Please see the guidelines at WSC 2021 Programme_Proposals (downloadable PDF) for full details on submitting programme proposals.

Byzantium - Bridge between Worlds

24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Istanbul, 23-28 August 2021

Due to its remarkably long duration, territorial expanse, geographical situation and complex cultural traditions, Byzantium acted as a temporal and spatial bridge connecting different periods, geographical areas, and cultures. Byzantium acted as a transition between ancient, medieval and early modern worlds around the Mediterranean basin, Eurasia and the Near East through reception, appropriation, and innovation. It connected different geographical and cultural spaces through political, economic, material, and cultural networks in many of which it constituted an important node. Centering on the key theme of 'Byzantium - Bridge between Worlds,' the 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies aims to explore this connecting and mediatory role of Byzantium. It also hopes to initiate proposals on bridging interdisciplinary gaps within Byzantine studies and strengthening dialogue with other relevant fields.

Important dates

Conference Date: 23-28 August 2021
Announcement of the Plenary Session Participants: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Round Tables: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Thematic Free Communication Sessions and Participants: 15 April 2019
Call for Free Communications and Poster/VR Sessions: 15 April 2019
Period for Plenary Session Paper Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for Round Table Abstract Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for submitting Free Communication and Poster/VR Abstracts: 15 April 2019 - 15 April 2020