Conferences

San Apollinaris in Classe, Ravenna
(Photograph: Andrew Stephenson)

Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 9–14 2022. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

PLEASE NOTE: The 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies will be virtual.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is May 18, 2021. Proposals should include:

**Title
**Session abstract (300 words)
**A description of the importance and/or timeliness of the proposed session (100 words)
**Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session presider)
**CV

Applicants will be contacted by May 25, 2021, regarding the status of their proposal. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the Congress and will keep the organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse up to 5 session participants (presenters and presider) for the cost of conference registration. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Further information about the International Congress on Medieval Studies.

ANZAMEMS 2022

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies conference committee seeks proposals for its 2021 conference on the theme ‘Reception and Emotion’, to be held in Perth, Australia at The University of Western Australia on 27 June-1 July 2022.  The conference will be held online.

The committee welcomes all approaches to topics related to ‘reception and emotion’ broadly conceived (and conceived either together or separately: i.e., on reception and emotion, or on either reception or emotion), including but not limited to: trans-cultural, trans-temporal, trans-disciplinary, translation, global studies, creative misreadings, theatrical and literary revivals, forgeries, homages, cultural counter-strikes, regimes of periodisation, etc. We welcome proposals considering the usefulness or otherwise of reception history as a methodology: is ‘transformation’ more helpful than ‘reception’, for example, for appreciating the active role of the audience of a text, play, or idea?

Work on emotions can be similarly broad, covering, e.g., what’s evidenced from the ‘receivers’ and from the ‘received’ (thinking of work, for example, on how Indigenous people have received missionaries and their doctrines; how medievalists have reacted and acted in relation to the worrying associations of their discipline; even how humanities scholars feel about their reception in contemporary political circles; Jan Plamper’s suggestion that historians should keep ‘field diaries’ about their personal response to work in the archives; are there ‘objective’ studies?). What’s been the value and downside of the ‘emotional turn’ in humanities studies? How do we as scholars of the past deal with presentist notions of ‘relevance’, and need we consider past scholarship as ‘outdated? How can we marry approaches from humanities and life sciences in ‘emotions history’?

The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, 90-minute themed panels (of no more than 4 speakers) or workshops. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The reception of ideas about emotion in medieval/early modern texts;
  • Reception and transformation of ideologies across time and space;
  • The emotions of an audience in the reception of a play or sermon;
  • The emotional impact of a text on a reader;
  • Rituals and practices of receiving guests and dignitaries (and their emotional effects?);
  • The reception of the past: medievalism and early-modernism;
  • The reception of bodies / emotions and bodies / embodiment;
  • Reception / emotion and sexuality;
  • Reception / emotion and race;
  • Reception / emotion and gender;
  • Reception / emotion and music / art.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title;
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words);
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words).

The conference committee welcomes themed panel or workshop session proposals for the conference. Proposals should consist of:

  1. Panel/Workshop Title;
  2. Proposed Chair (if available);
  3. Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

NB: Workshops will be allotted 90 minutes, 30 of which should be reserved for general discussion. We suggest a maximum of 6 speakers.

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) by 18 February 2022 to: anzamems2021@gmail.com.

NB: Should you require early acceptance of your proposal please highlight this in your email and the committee will do our best to accommodate your request.

The conference will be preceded by an ANZAMEMS seminar. An invitation for expressions of interest will follow in a separate email.

For more information please see the conference website.

ANZAMEMS Seminar: ‘Vectors of Emotion’

The committee of ANZAMEMS 2021 is delighted to Call for Expressions of Interest in the ANZAMEMS Seminar ‘Vectors of Emotion’, which will precede the conference in June 2022 from 11am–4pm (lunch and afternoon tea will be included).

Seminar Leader: Assoc. Prof Kathryn Prince (The University of Western Australia)

About the Seminar 

Drama relies on the palpable circulation of emotions onstage and in the audience, which is one reason for its reliable function as a vector of emotion between the moment of its creation and of its performance. Working with medieval and early modern scripts, participants in this Seminar will apply various History of Emotions approaches to the performance of selected scenes in order to develop an understanding of the emotional practices within plays of various genres, styles, and periods from the medieval to the early modern. No performance skills are required or expected, and the workshop is designed to engage anyone with an interest not only in theatre but also in cultural and intellectual history, scholarly editing, music, art, and literature. Participants will gain an understanding of the relationship between theories of emotions and their practice, both in performance and more broadly. Because this Seminar will involve various kinds of active participation, applicants should advise the organiser of any accessibility requirements, which will be quietly and cheerfully accommodated.

How to Apply 

Expressions of Interest should consist of:

  1. Your name, institutional affiliation, and year of HDR candidacy (MA, MRes, PhD) or ECR status (with priority to those who have not yet found permanent employment);
  2. Your field/s of research;
  3. A 250-word statement explaining your interest in participating in the Seminar and how you believe participation will assist your research and/or career development;
  4. Any accessibility requirements.

Please email Expressions of Interest for the ANZAMEMS Seminar (as a Word document attachment) to: anzamems2021@gmail.com (with the email title 'Vectors of Emotions Seminar Application').

Reception, Emotion and the Royal Body: Panel at ANZAMEMS 2022

This panel will convene at the Thirteenth Biennial Conference of the Australia and New Zealand Association of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (#anza21), to be held at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, June 2022.

The idea of the ‘king’s two bodies’, a duality predicated on the idea that a monarch possessed two bodies, a body natural and a body politic – the former mortal, the latter an embodiment of both the nation and the authority of sovereignty – has long been of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern monarchies.

The body of a monarch remains a contest site, with the life, health, fertility, and sexuality of kings or queens continuing to be an important part of politics. Royal scandal graces the covers of newspapers and magazines and trends on social media, and royal weddings, births, and deaths continue to capture the public’s imagination and interest.

We seek papers that examine the significance of the royal body, in particular, the reception of the royal body across time periods, cultures, and media and how royal bodies both convey and elicit emotions:

Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* Historiography
* Iconography and representation
* Drama and literature
* Political theory
* Divine bodies
* Rituals and ceremony
* Effigies and monuments
* Age, health and pregnancy
* Fertility, chastity, virility
* Royal births and deaths
* Christenings, coronations, weddings and funerals
* Regicide
* Royal touch
* Deformity and disability
* Royal Dress
* Sex and Scandal
* Gender
* Sexuality
* Race
* Medievalism and early-modernism
* Performance
* Audiences
* Popular culture
* Film and television
* Comics and graphic novels
* Fandom
* Celebrity

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:
1. A title
2. An abstract (max. 200 words)
3. A short biography (max. 50 words)

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to:
mgerzic@gmail.com.

Aesthetics in Early Modern Poetry

We invite scholarly proposals for papers on aesthetics in medieval and early modern poetry (c. 400 to 1800), as part of a panel or panels being established at ANZAMEMS 2022.

The panel(s) will examine the influence of aesthetic styles, movements, rhetorical and aesthetic techniques and theories on the development of poetry, or the work of specified poet(s) at any time during the relevant periods in Europe and Britain. Papers should be set within the broader topic of the overall conference, and deal with questions of reception and/or emotion. Papers might consider:

* The role of emotions in medieval or early modern aesthetic theories;
* Models of embodiment in aesthetic theories during the period;
* Theories of affect, ‘affectus’ and/or feelings;
* The impact of theological and biblical sources (for example, by Augustine and Aquinas);
* The impact of philosophy of mind, body, morality and ethics (such as Platonic and Aristotelian);
* Formal theories of poetics and rhetoric, including the role of style in poetic and rhetorical figures and tropes;
* The impact of artistic movements (such as Neoplatonist, Neoclassical, Baroque) and the reciprocal influence of visual arts on poetry (eg ut pictura poesis);
* Public and private models of ‘taste’, audience and reception;
* The role of pleasure, the imagination and sensuous and vivid imagery;
* Techniques for the aestheticization of the sacred (such as the poetics of enigma);
* Theories of the sublime and the beautiful;
* Participatory versus objectivist aesthetics;
* Materialist, or transcendental and idealist models;
* Poststructural or psychoanalytic approaches; or
* The role and value of historicist and/or modern theory.

We invite submissions for 20 minute presentations, followed by 5 minutes of Q&A. If you are interested in presenting your work, please send the title, a 200 word abstract and a 50 word biography, at the first instance to Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au.

The panel(s) will be held as part of the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, at the School of Humanities, The University of Western Australia, Perth, June 2022.

If you have any questions, please contact Dr Jane Vaughan at jane.vaughan@uwa.edu.au.

Reception, Emotion and the Crusades

Panels at ANZAMEMS Conference, 27 June–1 July 2022.

The theme for the 2022 ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) conference is ‘Reception and Emotion’. Professor Megan Cassidy-Welch (Australian Catholic University) and Dr Beth Spacey (University of Queensland) are inviting proposals for 20-minute papers to be part of a strand of themed panels examining aspects of reception and/or emotion, broadly conceived, in a crusading context. Please send your 200-word abstracts and paper title, along with a short bio (max. 50 words), to Beth (b.spacey@uq.edu.au) by 30 September 2021.

The thirteenth biennial ANZAMEMS Conference will be held on 27 June to 1 July 2022 in Perth at the University of Western Australia. More information, including details regarding travel bursaries, is available here.

Leeds International Medieval Conference

University of Leeds, 4-7 July 2022

Conference website.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus. In 2022 this is ‘Borders’.

Medieval borders have preoccupied scholars for several decades in various guises. The term ‘border’ designates a wide variety of phenomena: physical geographical limits, that can be signalled by border markers or natural features, points where toll has to be paid, political boundaries, that vary from points in space to linear and fortified military fronts, ways of controlling space, frontier zones, borderlands, porous zones of encounters and contact, ways of limiting community and identity, ideological and metaphorical delimitation including discourse and representation, bordering practices, the process of creating and performing borders, and borderscapes to capture fluidity and change over time.

Paper proposal deadline: 31 August 2021

Session proposal deadline: 30 September 2021

Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 2022 International Medieval Congress

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 2022 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 4-7 July 2022. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2022 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is 3 September 2021. Proposals should include:

*Title
*100-word session abstract
*Session moderator and academic affiliation
*Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
*CV

Applicants will be contacted by mid-September about the status of their proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please note that all listed speakers and the moderator should be prepared to participate remotely should health conditions necessitate a virtual conference or should local conditions make travel inadvisable for a participant. In the case of remote participation, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse participants for conference registration.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 48th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 48th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held at the University of California, Los Angeles, 3-6 November 2022. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is 22 April 22 2022.

If the proposed session is accepted, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 5 session participants (presenters and chair) up to $600 maximum for scholars based in North America and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside North America. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement. For scholars participating remotely, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse participants for conference registration.

Further details and submission instructions.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.