Colonialism and its Narratives: Rethinking the Colonial Archive in Australia

Conference

Colonialism and its Narratives: Rethinking the Colonial Archive in Australia

This conference aims to bring together new approaches to colonial Australia across the arts, humanities and social sciences. Colonialism puts a range of practices and discourses into play: violent encounters, dispossession, trauma, ‘development’, ‘civilisation’, governance, trade and so on.

It produces endless narratives about what it is, what it does and the lives it radically changes. It is both immensely destructive and energetically productive: recording its various practices and discourses through a rapidly growing range of media and visual technologies.

The narratives of colonialism worked to reinvent Australia in colonialism’s image, leaving us with legacies and frameworks that continue to shape who we are and how we identify to the world around us. Sometimes we try to ‘forget’ colonialism, but it constantly claims us and returns to us; we continue to live in its aftermath.

Image: Black Thursday, February 6th 1851 (detail), William Strutt, 1864. State Library of Victoria.

Presenters

  • Professor Lynette Russell
    Professor Lynette Russell, Director, Monash Indigenous Studies Centre
  •  Bruce Pascoe
    Bruce Pascoe, Writer
  • Associate Professor Penny Edmonds
    Associate Professor Penny Edmonds, School of Humanities
  • Professor Tim Bonyhady
    Professor Tim Bonyhady, Director, Centre for Law, Arts & the Humanities