Relationalist ethical impulse amidst colonial violence


This webinar is the second in the Indigenous Settler Relations Collaboration's 2021 Critical Public Conversations series: Exploring Indigenous Settler Relations

Relationalism is a central conceptual and practical feature of Aboriginal political ordering. We first articulate some of the key elements and characteristics of this relationism as posited in our contribution to the recuperative work of articulating Aboriginal political philosophy. Second, we argue that this relationalism enables and produces an ethical impulse contra survivalist and sovereign tendencies of western political thought, leading to the claim that relationalism is a vehicle for the pursuit of Aboriginal-informed political ordering and Australian nation-building. Third, we ask: How might such relationalism be mobilised amidst our present settler-colonial relations? We argue that recalibrating relations with land and place are a way to begin, but that mobilising relationalism requires viscerally inhabiting relations of intimate entanglement that mix support with destruction, care with brutal violence (including the state killing of deaths in custody), and appreciation with shocking disregard.

Presenters

Dr Mary Graham, Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Political Science and International Studies, the University of Queensland.

Associate Professor Morgan Brigg, Director Rotary Program, Indigenous Engagement & Associate Professor, School of Political Science and International Studies, the University of Queensland.

Host

Professor Sarah Maddison, Deputy Dean, Faculty of Arts and co-director of the Indigenous Settler Relations Collaboration, University of Melbourne.

The presenters have granted permission for this recording to be used for personal viewing and educational purposes. Please contact i-SRC@unimelb.edu.au before sharing for any other reason.