Program

Our graduate research program is designed to enhance the experience of Masters and PhD students by creating an enriching cohort experience, that develops an intellectual community and facilitates opportunities to deepen students’ academic knowledge and skills.


The program is informed by approaches to doctoral pedagogy grounded in student-centred and transformative praxis. Drawing on the work of Michelle Trudgett (2014) and inspiration from the Maori and Indigenous (MAI) (Pihama et al., 2019) and Supporting Aboriginal Graduate Enhancement (SAGE) (Pidgeon et al., 2014) programs, our graduate research programs is based on and promotes Indigenous doctoral pedagogy as best practice for all students.

The ISRC’s Interdisciplinary Graduate Research Program is focused around a series of masterclasses delivered by scholars presenting in the ISRC critical public conversation seminar series. The masterclasses are supplemented with a set of research development activities designed to accelerate research careers of students engaged in the program:

  • workshops focused on ethics, research methods, approaches for communicating research to diverse audiences across and beyond the academy.
  • research symposium
  • writing retreats
  • research incubators

In addition to the core program, the ISRC facilitates a range of regular, open events and activities that we warmly invite you to join, including the seminar series, our critical reading group, public lectures and film screenings. We also invite students in the program to meet regularly throughout each semester to share research progress and to participate in writing sessions.

February 2021

Welcome Event and launch of the Graduate Research Program 2021

March 2021

Research Ethics Workshop

An ethical starting point for relational work is the understanding that ‘the relations between Indigenous peoples, settlers, and the settler state [is] the focal point of inquiry rather than the lives and bodies of Indigenous peoples’ (Nakata & Maddison, 2019, p. 419). Thus we seek to decenter disciplinary authority to know Indigenous peoples, and prioritise the relations between Indigenous peoples and the settler order.

This workshop will explore both the ethical principles for relational research, and critical reflections on navigating ethics approval processes.

Masterclass

ISRC masterclasses will be delivered by the presenters from our regular Critical Public Conversation series. In 2021 this series will feature a range of Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars contributing to the emerging interdisciplinary field of Indigenous settler relations, attending to its possibilities and limitations through critical reflections on what this field is, and what it does.

The masterclasses will be an opportunity to take up key concepts from the work of the presenters and create opportunities for critically engagement and discussion in greater depth. The masterclasses will also allow attendees to reflect upon their own research in light of the insights that the presenters’ work has revealed.

Required reading will be provided to participants in advance of each masterclass.

April 2021

Research Methods Workshop

The interdisciplinary methodological approach of the RHD program is a framework informed by relational ethics and self-reflexivity. Guided by the understanding that ‘research is not an innocent or distant academic exercise but an activity that has something at stake and that occurs in a set of political and social conditions’ (Smith, 2012, p. 5), the program seeks to encourage critical thought accompanied by research practices that are attentive to issues of accountability, respect, care, renewal and insurgency.

This workshop will centre on discussions of how we question and make questions of this thing we are calling ‘Indigenous-settler relations’ and conduct work utilising decolonising methods as research practice.

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

May 2021

Collaborator workshop

Collaborator workshops are conducted in partnership with a member of the ISRC academic network and provide the opportunity to engage beyond the CPC series and academic development workshops to focus on a key area of Indigenous-settler relations. The speaker or workshop facilitator will be confirmed in early 2021.

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

June 2021

Research Incubator

Incubator sessions are intended to help shape and develop emerging work – ideally towards output like a thesis chapter, a publication, a grant application, a conference proposal – with other students, the ISRC co-directors and collaborators providing feedback, ideas and comment to assist with moving projects forward.

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

July 2021

Winter Writing Retreat

The ISRC Writing Retreats provide participants with structure, time, and encouragement to make progress on their writing in the company of other scholars. They are designed to provide you with the physical and mental space to write as part of a community of productive student researchers.

The program will include structured writing time, facilitated workshops, and informal discussions, debriefing sessions and the celebration of progress made.

August 2021

Collaborator workshop

Collaborator workshops are conducted in partnership with a member of the ISRC academic network and provide the opportunity to engage beyond the CPC series and academic development workshops to focus on a key area of Indigenous-settler relations. The speaker or workshop facilitator will be confirmed in early 2021.

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

September 2021

Publishing workshop

The publishing workshop is focused on exploring opportunities for disseminating research and building a publication profile in the field of Indigenous-settler relations. Core topics include:

  • developing a publication plan
  • identifying suitable journals
  • understanding the difference between writing for the thesis and writing for journals
  • develop an ethical politics of citation in the field of Indigenous-settler relations

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

October 2021

Preparing to teach workshop

The introductory Preparing to Teach workshop explores some of the most common issues in teaching in the field of Indigenous-settler relations, including; teaching positionality, policy as a site of conflict and encounter, addressing race and racism, and exploring appropriate ways to include or recognise Indigenous pedagogies in higher education.

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

November 2021

Research Symposium

The ISRC Research Symposium invites participants to showcase and share their excellent and innovative work in the field of Indigenous-settler relations. We invite attendees to share their questions and critiques, experience and knowledge. We seek to create a space to have difficult conversations, which are essential for justice and our collective futures. We will focus on developing learning communities and creating conversations that will generate collaboration amongst scholars in the university setting.

The main aims of the symposium are:

  • to bring together graduates working in different disciplines, within the Indigenous-settler relations field
  • to allow students to profile their topics and receive support/feedback from panels and peers
  • to present successful pathways for organising and producing a thesis in the field
  • to identify strategic issues in undertaking higher education in the field

The symposium’s purpose is to foster the exchange of information, help HDR scholars to progress their research themes, provide/receive feedback, and create an engaging space for Indigenous-settler relations research.

Masterclass

1-hour session with the presenter of this month’s Critical Public Conversation series, focused on exploring the key themes and questions raised in their presentation.

December 2021

Summer Writing Retreat

The ISRC Writing Retreats provide participants with structure, time, and encouragement to make progress on their writing in the company of other scholars. They are designed to provide you with the physical and mental space to write as part of a community of productive student researchers.

The program will include structured writing time, facilitated workshops, and informal discussions, debriefing sessions and the celebration of progress made.

Program of regular events

  • 1st Friday of every month: Reading sprints
  • 2nd Friday of every month: Shut up and write
  • 3rd Friday of every month: Study circle
  • 4th Friday of every month: Shut up and write

ISRC Research Room

Room E473 in John Medley East (Building 191) is available to graduate program students during working hours. The room includes computers, desks, lockable cabinets, telephones and a meeting area with a large display screen. There is also access to a shared printer / copier / scanner and kitchenette with a fridge and microwave available on level 4.