Understanding the causes and consequences of political and institutional trust

This project used a series of cross-national survey experiments allowing us to better understand the causes and consequences of political and institutional trust.

Understanding the causes and consequences of political and institutional trust


Overview

Political trust has been said to have reached crisis levels in many established democracies. Yet, despite the importance of political trust to the functioning of democratic systems we have very little experimental data on what the causes of political trust are. This research project involved administering a number of survey experiments in different countries to better understand the causes and consequences of political and institutional trust. These studies offered insights into how political trust may be improved and how government may enlist trusted cue givers to communicate with citizens in ways that have the potential to enhance the wellbeing of society.

Outcomes / activities

This research played a key role in advancing the use of survey experiments in Australian political science. It increased our understanding of the real world effects of political trust (in Australia and elsewhere) and how some of the negative effects of political trust can be ameliorated.

Project details

Sponsors

Australian Research Council – Discovery Early Career Research Award

Research partners

King’s College London
University of Toronto
Yale University

Project team

Associate Professor Aaron Martin (University of Melbourne)

Contact

Associate Professor Aaron Martin