Classics and Archaeology

2017

Old Society, New Belief: Religious transformation of China and Rome, ca. 1st-6th CenturiesKim, Hyun Jin. "Justin Martyr and Tatian: Christian Reactions to Encounters with Greco-Roman Culture and Imperial Persecution," in Poo, Mu-chou; Drake, H.A. and Raphals, lisa (eds.,). Old Society, New Belief: Religious transformation of China and Rome, ca. 1st-6th Centuries. OUP, 2017

This book brings together specialists in the history and religion of Rome and China with a twofold aim. First, it aims to show in some detail the similarities and differences each religion encountered in the process of merging into a new cultural environment. Second, by juxtaposing the familiar with the foreign, it also aims to capture aspects of this process that could otherwise be overlooked. This approach is based on the general proposition that, when a new religious belief begins to make contact with a society that has already had long honoured beliefs, certain areas of contention will inevitably ensue and changes on both sides have to take place. More information...

Eurasian Empires in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages Contact and Exchange between the Graeco-Roman World, Inner Asia and ChinaKim, Hyun Jin; Vervaet, Frederik and Adali, Selim (eds.,). Eurasian Empires in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages Contact and Exchange between the Graeco-Roman World, Inner Asia and China. Cambridge University Press, 2017

The great empires of the vast Eurasian continent have captured the imagination of many. Awe-inspiring names such as ancient Rome, Han and Tang China, Persia, Assyria, the Huns, the Kushans and the Franks have been the subject of countless scholarly books and works of literature. However, very rarely, if at all, have these vast pre-industrial empires been studied holistically from a comparative, interdisciplinary and above all Eurasian perspective. This collection of studies examines the history, literature and archaeology of these empires and others thus far treated separately as a single inter-connected subject of inquiry. It highlights in particular the critical role of Inner Asian empires and peoples in facilitating contacts and exchange across the Eurasian continent in antiquity and the early Middle Ages. More information...

Minoan Architecture and Urbanism: New Perspectives on an Ancient Built EnvironmentHitchcock, L. and Maeir, A.M. "Lost in Translation: Settlement Organization in Postpalatial Crete, a View from the East," in Letesson, Quentin and Knappett, Carl (eds.,). Minoan Architecture and Urbanism: New Perspectives on an Ancient Built Environment. OUP, 2017.

Minoan Crete is rightly famous for its idiosyncratic architecture, as well as its palaces and towns such as Knossos, Malia, Gournia, and Palaikastro. Indeed, these are often described as the first urban settlements of Bronze Age Europe. However, we still know relatively little about the dynamics of these early urban centres. How did they work? What role did the palaces have in their towns, and the towns in their landscapes? More information...

Archaeologies of Gender and ViolenceHitchcock, Louise. "Gender and Violence in Archaeology: Final Commentary," in Jensen, Bo and Matić, Uroš (eds.,). Archaeologies of Gender and Violence. Oxbow Books, 2017

Uroš Matić and Bo Jensen have brought together a team of both young and senior researches from many different countries in this first volume that aims to explore the complex intersection between archaeology, gender and violence. Papers range from theoretical discussions on previous approaches to gender and violence and the ethical necessity to address these questions today, to case studies dealing on gender and violence from prehistoric to early medieval Europe, but also including studies on ancient Egypt, Persia and Peru. More information...

Non-Scribal Communication Media in the Bronze Age Aegean and Surrounding AreasDavis, Brent and Valério, M. "Cypro-Minoan in Marking Systems of the Eastern and Central Mediterranean: New Insights into Old Problems," in Jasink, A.M., Weingarten, J. and Ferrara, S. (eds.,). Non-Scribal Communication Media in the Bronze Age Aegean and Surrounding Areas. Firenze University Press, 2017

This volume is intended to be the first in a series that will focus on the origin of script and the boundaries of non-scribal communication media in proto-literate and literate societies of the ancient Aegean. Over the last 30 years, the domain of scribes and bureaucrats has become much better known. Our goal now is to reach below the élite and scribal levels to interface with non-scribal operations conducted by people of the 'middling' sort. Who made these marks and to what purpose? Did they serve private or (semi-) official roles in Bronze Age Aegean society? The comparative study of such practices in the contemporary East (Cyprus, Anatolia, the Levant, and Egypt) can shed light on sub-elite activities in the Aegean and also provide evidence for cultural and economic exchange networks. More information...

2016

Metaphysis: Ritual, Myth and Symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age (Aegaeum)Hitchcock, Louise; Maeir, A. and Dagan, A. "Entangling Aegean Ritual in Philistine Culture," in F. Blakolmer et al (eds). Metaphysis: Ritual, Myth and Symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age (Aegaeum). Peeters, 2016

In Aegean prehistory, questions of ritual behaviour and underlying 'metaphysical' beliefs have become a widespread and multifaceted field of research based on a large variety of methodological approaches. At the METAPHYSIS conference a large range of issues of ritual, myth and symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age were addressed, such as ritual places and ritual landscapes, sacral and sepulchral rituals, social and political ceremonies, ritual acts and performances, the supernatural realm, liminality, irrationality and magic, mythology, hybrid creatures, heroes/heroines, divinities, symbols, emblems and iconography, images of power, and cosmology. Thus, METAPHYSIS was dedicated to the complex relationship between humans and 'the other' - the broad scholarly interface between a popular ritual belief and the cult of deities, ie religion in its proper sense. More information...

A History of Syria in One Hundred SitesJamieson, Andrew and Kanjou, J. "Tell Qumluq (Aleppo)," in Kanjou, Y. and Tsuneki, A. (eds). A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites. Archaeopress, 2016

This volume presents the long history of Syria through a jouney of the most important and recently-excavated archaeological sites. The sites cover over 1.8 million years and all regions in Syria; 110 academics have contributed information on 103 excavations for this volume. Based on these contributions the volume offers a detailed summary of the history of Syria, a history as important as any in terms of the development of human society. It is hoped that this knowledge will offer not only an increased understanding of the country but also act as a deterrent to the destruction of Syrian cultural heritage and facilitate the protection of Syrian sites. More information...

2015

 Text, Gloss, and Illustration in Neidhart's 1486 German Edition of Terence's Eunuchus," in Turner, A. and Torello-Hill, Giulia (eds.,). Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing. Koninklijke Brill NV, 2015Chong-Gossard, K.O. "Thais Walks the German Streets: Text, Gloss, and Illustration in Neidhart's 1486 German Edition of Terence’s Eunuchus," in Turner, A. and Torello-Hill, Giulia (eds.,). Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing. Koninklijke Brill NV, 2015.

Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing investigates the Medieval and Early Renaissance reception of Terence in highly innovative ways, combining the diverse but interrelated strands of textual criticism, illustrative tradition, and performance. The plays of Terence seem to have remained unperformed until the Renaissance, but they were a central text for educators in Western Europe. Manuscripts of the plays contained scholarship and illustrations which were initially inspired by Late Antique models, and which were constantly transformed in response to contemporary thought. The contributions in this work deal with these topics, as well as the earliest printed editions of Terence, theatrical revivals in Northern Italy, and the readership of Terence throughout the Early Middle Ages. More information...

The Huns (Peoples of the Ancient World) Kim, Hyun Jin The Huns (Peoples of the Ancient World). Routledge, 2015

This volume is a concise introduction to the history and culture of the Huns. This ancient people had a famous reputation in Eurasian Late Antiquity. However, their history has often been evaluated as a footnote in the histories of the later Roman Empire and early Germanic peoples. Kim addresses this imbalance and challenges the commonly held assumption that the Huns were a savage people who contributed little to world history, examining striking geopolitical changes brought about by the Hunnic expansion over much of continental Eurasia and revealing the Huns' contribution to European, Iranian, Chinese and Indian civilization and statecraft. By examining Hunnic culture as a Eurasian whole, The Huns provides a full picture of their society which demonstrates that this was a complex group with a wide variety of ethnic and linguistic identities. More information...

2014

Horesh, Nov and Kavalski, Emilian (eds.,). Asian Thought on China's Changing International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan, 2014Kim, Hyun Jin. "Korean Responses to Historic Narratives of Sino-Korean Relations and China's New International Relations Thinking," in Horesh, Nov and Kavalski, Emilian (eds.,). Asian Thought on China's Changing International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, pp. 173-191.

At the end of the Cold War, commentators were pondering how far Western ideas would spread in an international environment defined by 'the end of history'. Today, the debate seems to be how far Chinese ideas will reach. This innovative edited volume goes beyond the conventional focus on China's bilateral relations, in a bid to identify the extent to which China's nascent rise has provoked fresh geo-strategic and intellectual shifts within Asia. Offering a unique discussion of the evolution of Chinese schools of International Relations and the reactions of China's Asian partners to the practices of its international interactions, the contributors to this volume seek to explain and understand the relational nature of China's international outreach in the full spectrum of its unabridged complexity, contingency, and contradictions. More information...

 The Principle of the summum imperium auspiciumque from 509 to 19 BCE. Franz Steiner Verlag GmbH, 2014Vervaet, Frederik J. The High Command in the Roman Republic: The Principle of the summum imperium auspiciumque from 509 to 19 BCE. Franz Steiner Verlag GmbH, 2014.

While the terminology has long been noted, the republican principle of the summum imperium auspiciumque, the high command and the prevailing auspices, has never been subject to comprehensive scrutiny. This enquiry for the first time identifies this principle as a coherent concept in Roman constitutional and administrative practice, being the senatorial oligarchy's foremost instrument to reconcile collegiate rule with the necessity of a unified high command. After defining the relevant terms and the scope of the high command both in Rome and in the field, a number of case studies yield striking new insights into the constitutional ramifications for the allocation of public triumphs, the position of the consuls in the provinces, and the official hierarchy in combined commands, highlighting the fascinating interplay between these largely customary rules of engagement and the nobility's own code of honour. This study also casts a provocative new light on how the high command was gradually monopolized by dynasts in the tumultuous period between Sulla's dictatorship and the emergence of the Augustan monarchy. Finally, a postscript addresses the vexed question of the lex curiata de imperio. More information...

 Ceramics. Brepols, 2014Jamieson, Andrew. "Late Reserved Slip Ware," and "Cyma-Recta Cups," in Lebeau (ed.,). Arcane Interregional: Ceramics. Brepols, 2014, pp. 95-108 and pp. 111-121.

The first interregional volume of the ARCANE collection gathers twenty-two contributions concerning ceramic fabrics that were produced from Egypt to Iran and from Thrace to Southern Mesopotamia across the third millennium BCE. These contributions, written by senior scholars and advanced doctoral students, are based primarily on complete vessels from secure stratigraphical contexts. They present the most recent and complete update on Near and Middle Eastern ceramic wares throughout the Early Bronze Age. More information...

Davis, Brent. Minoan Stone Vessels with Linear A Inscriptions. Peeters Publishers, 2014Davis, Brent. Minoan Stone Vessels with Linear A Inscriptions. Peeters Publishers, 2014.

Inscribed Minoan stone vessels are ritual gifts that index their dedicants' intention that both their gift and their name should survive permanently at the place of dedication. These vessels contained offerings, yet the vessels themselves were also offerings, serving as permanent records of a ritual act. These rituals were most likely communal, incorporating group feasting and drinking. The seasonality of these rituals suggests that they were focused on the cycle of life: fertility, birth, death and renewal. As for Linear A itself: the language behind the script appears to contain a fairly standard phonemic inventory, though there are hints of additional, more exotic phonemes. The morphology of the language appears to involve affixation, a typical mode of inflection in human languages. The presence of significant prefixing tends to rule out PIE as a parent language, while the word-internal vowel alternations typical of Afroasiatic verbal inflection are nowhere to be found in this script. In the end, Linear A appears most likely to represent a non-IE, non-Afroasiatic language, perhaps with agglutinative tendencies, and perhaps with VSO word order. More information...

 Past and Present. Brill, 2014Hitchcock, Louise. "Conspicuous desctruction and the economy of sacrifice in the Bronze and Early Iron Age East Mediterranean," in Houtman, A., Poorthuis, M., Schwartz, J. and Turner, Y. (eds.,). The Actuality of Sacrifice: Past and Present. Brill, 2014.

Sacrifice is a well known form of ritual in many world religions. Although the actual practice of animal sacrifice was largely abolished in the later history of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, it is still recalled through biblical stories, the ritual calendar and community events. The essays in this volume discuss the various positions regarding the value of sacrifice in a wide variety of disciplines such as history, archaeology, literature, philosophy, art and gender and post-colonial studies. In this context they examine a wide array of questions pertaining to the 'actuality of sacrifice' in various social, historical and intellectual contexts ranging from the pre-historical to the post-Holocaust, and present new understandings of some of the most sensitive topics of our time. More information...

A Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient MediterraneanLee-Stecum, Parshia. "Roman Elite Ethnicty," in McInerney, Jeremy (ed.,). A Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014.

A Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean presents a comprehensive collection of essays contributed by Classical Studies scholars that explore questions relating to ethnicity in the ancient Mediterranean world. *Covers topics of ethnicity in civilisations ranging from ancient Egypt and Israel, to Greece and Rome, and into Late Antiquity. The Companion features cutting-edge research on ethnicity relating to Philistine, Etruscan, and Phoenician identities; reveals the explicit relationships between ancient and modern ethnicities; introduces an interpretation of ethnicity as an active component of social identity; and represents a fundamental questioning of formally accepted and fixed categories in the field. More information...

Kim, Hyun Jin; Horesh, N. and Mauch, P. Superpower, China? Historicizing Beijing's New Narrative of Leadership and East Asia's Response Thereto. World Scientific Publishing Company, 2014Kim, Hyun Jin; Horesh, N. and Mauch, P. Superpower, China? Historicizing Beijing's New Narrative of Leadership and East Asia's Response Thereto. World Scientific Publishing Company, 2014

This book sets out to answer how China's rise can best be understood from both East Asian and Western perspectives. It also assesses the prospect of realignment away from the US hegemony in East Asia in light of persistent regional rivalries. Throughout the book, the authors show that for China's neighbours, as well as for its own intellectuals, historicizing the country's rise provides one way of understanding its current ascendant trajectory, on the one hand, and acute social problems, on the other. More information...