MIG Seminar - Eric Stone - Getting serious about graphical structures in genome sciences

Seminar/Forum

MIG Seminar - Eric Stone - Getting serious about graphical structures in genome sciences

Getting serious about graphical structures in genome sciences

Systems biology, defined broadly, is the study of how components of a biological system interact. Graphs, meanwhile, are general representations of the pairwise interactions (edges) between arbitrary components (vertices). It is no wonder, then, that graphs pervade systems biology and genome sciences in general. This talk is an attempt to lay some ground rules for making sense of them. I will focus on the ubiquitous issue of “missing vertices” that correspond to unmeasured components of the biological system. To do so, I will introduce a formal definition of graphs with missing vertices, and I will discuss how and why these objects are amenable to theory. Subsequently, I will discuss how theoretical results can be leveraged to make biological inference. I aim to provide a range of biological applications/illustrations spanning phylogenetics, population genetics, systems biology and beyond. While this talk will synthesise concepts from mathematics (i.e. spectral graph theory) and multivariate statistics (i.e. principal components analysis and multidimensional scaling), accessibility is not predicated on previous knowledge.

Presenter

  • Professor Eric Stone
    Professor Eric Stone, Director of the ANU-CSIRO Centre for Genomics, Metabolomics and Bioinformatics