Associate researchers

Dr Anita Archer
Dr Anita Archer

Dr Anita Archer

Research Associate, Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture Research Unit, Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne

Anita Archer is an art historian whose research focus is contemporary art markets, with interest in the changing dynamics of primary and secondary markets, the evolving domination of multinational auction houses and the networked activities of art world intermediaries in the translocation of art globally. Anita’s PhD thesis examined the emerging market for Chinese Contemporary Art in the West and her recent focus is the role of Singapore as an art market hub for Southeast Asia. Anita’s research interest stems from her extensive work experience in the global art field as an international auctioneer and independent art consultant specialising in Asian contemporary art.

Email: anita.archer@unimelb.edu.au

Professor Trevor Burnard
Professor Trevor Burnard

Professor Trevor Burnard

Associate Director, Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture Research Unit; Professor, Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, University of Hull

Trevor Burnard is a scholar of early American, imperial, world and Atlantic history, with a special interest in plantation societies in the New World and their connections to eighteenth-century modernity. Particular interests include slavery, social history and demography, imperialism, economic and business history, and gender. His work over the last decade has been especially concerned with identity in the New World in the eighteenth century and with how settler societies have been formed, or have failed to form in plantation societies in the Caribbean and the Chesapeake.

Email: T.G.Burnard@hull.ac.uk

Associate Professor Justin Clemens
Associate Professor Justin Clemens

Associate Professor Justin Clemens

Academic, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Justin Clemen’s work focuses primarily on the relationships between poetry, psychology and philosophy in Romantic and post-Romantic writing. He has written extensively on figures such as Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Alain Badiou, as well as on themes of slavery and technology. His recent books include What is Education? (Edinburgh UP 2017), edited with A.J. Bartlett and The Afterlives of Georges Perec (Edinburgh UP 2017), edited with Rowan Wilken.

Email: jclemens@unimelb.edu.au
Photo credit: Nicholas Walton-Healey

Dr Thomas H. Ford
Dr Thomas H. Ford

Dr Thomas H. Ford

Lecturer in English, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University

Thomas Ford’s work focuses on poems and other texts from Romanticism and the long eighteenth century. He reads this archive in the historicist traditions of philological materialism, and in light of the transdisciplinary imperatives of the environmental humanities. Ford calls this approach ‘ecophilology’ (a discipline that explores the role of textual environments in various settings, in all kinds of media, from the ancient cave drawings and graffiti to the contemporary electronic media). You can read about it in his book, Wordsworth and the Poetics of Air (Cambridge University Press, April 2018).

Email: T.Ford@latrobe.edu.au

Dr Sean Gaston
Dr Sean Gaston

Dr Sean Gaston

Visiting Scholar, Wolfson College Oxford (2017-2018), Emeritus Reader in English, Brunel University, London, and Honorary Research Fellow, The University of Melbourne

I am exploring ‘the eighteenth century origins of modernity’. I have focused on concepts of disinterest, sympathy and pity, as well as fictions of imprudence and the invention of the literary character. I am now working on concepts of world in British Romanticism, Revolutionary America and the ‘Atlantic World’.

Email: gastons@unimelb.edu.au

Professor Charles Green
Professor Charles Green

Professor Charles Green

Professor of Contemporary Art, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Charles Green is an authority in contemporary international and Australian art, on biennials and exhibition histories, and on artist collaborations. His books include Biennials, Triennials and Documenta: The Exhibitions that Created Contemporary Art (2016, co-authored with Anthony Gardner), The Third Hand: Artist Collaborations from Conceptualism to Postmodernism (2001), and Peripheral Vision: Contemporary Australian Art 1970-94 (1995). He has been awarded several ARC grants and was Adjunct Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the National Gallery of Victoria (2001-2006), leading large curatorial teams who produced major exhibitions, including the inaugural, museum-wide installation of modern and contemporary Australian art at NGVA Federation Square (Fieldwork, 2001) as an outcome of an ARC Large Grant. He is also an artist, having worked in collaboration with Lyndell Brown as one artist since 1989; their works are in most Australian art museum collections and they were Australia’s Official War Artists in Iraq and Afghanistan in 2007.

Email: c.green@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Elias Greig
Dr Elias Greig

Dr Elias Greig

Research Assistant, Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture Research Unit, Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne

Elias Greig’s work considers the interaction between artistic and political representation, with a particular interest in the effects of democracy on literary form, from the eighteenth century to the present.

Email: elias.greig@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Steven Hampton
Dr Steven Hampton

Dr Steven Hampton

Sessional Lecturer in English and Theatre Studies, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Steven Hampton’s research centres on the multilingual and transnational nature of cultural and literary production during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in particular the interrelations between literatures in English, French and German. His current focus is the national epic as it was reconstructed, rediscovered or invented during the Age of Revolutions in Europe.

Email: hamptons@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Alexandra Hankinson
Dr Alexandra Hankinson

Dr Alexandra Hankinson

Research Assistant, Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture Research Unit, Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne

Alexandra Hankinson’s research focuses on the literary and cultural history of biological thought and phenomena from the Enlightenment to the present. Her doctoral thesis explored the cross-section between figurative and scientific thought in the botany and zoology of the long eighteenth century, with emphasis given to the way in which observation and analogy came together in this period to uncover and explain the affinities of living objects. She has published on the poetic and scientific history of insect pollination in Romanticism (2019) and is currently working on an online exhibition for the Romantic Circles Gallery of Visual Culture on hybrid and interspecific relationships. Her present research interests include the co-functioning of art and science in the discovery and description of camouflage and mimicry; histories of biodiversity and ecology in Australia; field notes; imaginative and scientific responses to avian migration; and seasonality and harvest in Romantic art and literature.

Email: alexandra.hankinson@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Jodi Heap
Dr Jodi Heap

Dr Jodi Heap

School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Jodie’s research focuses on Western philosophical conceptions of the imagination and the imaginary from Aristotle to Castoriadis. Her PhD thesis, titled The Imagination. The Seed of Indeterminacy in the Writings of Kant, Fichte and Castoriadis, offered a scholarly elucidation of the notion of the imagination and the imaginary as well as provided a new way of thinking about the imagination as an embodied power of formation and of creation fundamental to both the ontology of being and of ways of being. Her area of research also explores the role of the imagination and the imaginary in relation to the concepts of creation and creativity, and in relation to creative forms of thinking and of practice, both at the level of the individual and society. Jodie has a particular interest in the ERCC project ‘Creativity, Critique, Innovation’ and has contributed to the ERCC seminar series in her seminar titled, Unleashing the Creative Imagination in the Domains of the Humanities, Science and Art.

Email: jodie.heap@unimelb.edu.au

Dr James Jiang
Dr James Jiang

Dr James Jiang

School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

James Jiang’s research traces the residues of Romantic thought in modern and contemporary British and American writing. His recent articles on William James and Marianne Moore draw out the implications for literary modernism and philosophical pragmatism of concepts such as style and character – concepts which assume their modern shape in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. James is currently at work on a project entitled Sage Modernism that explores the intersection between pragmatist poetics and therapeutic culture.

Email: james.jiang@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Claire Knowles
Dr Claire Knowles

Dr Claire Knowles

Senior Lecturer in English Literature, La Trobe University, Melbourne

Claire Knowles has published numerous articles on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women writers. Her book, Sensibility and Female Poetic Tradition, 1780-1860: The Legacy of Charlotte Smith, was published by Ashgate in 2009 and she also recently edited, with Ingrid Horrocks, Charlotte Smith: Major Poetic Works (Broadview, 2017.) She is currently working on a project on newspaper poetry and popular literary culture in the Romantic period titled, "Romanticism, Newspapers, and the Democratization of Poetry, 1785-1810."

Email: c.knowles@latrobe.edu.au

Dr Elizabeth McLean
Dr Elizabeth McLean

Dr Elizabeth McLean

School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Elizabeth McLean’s research ranges from the Romantic period through to the contemporary, with a strong focus on processes of fictionality and genres of storytelling. She received her PhD in 2019 for her thesis, “The Topographical Parenthesis: Articulations of Space in the Novels of Henry James.” She is currently working on a trans-historical account of women’s literary journalism from the Enlightenment through to the present. This study is structured by four discrete episodes, that each present a composite of ideological and technological transformations vital to the professionalisation of literariness, journalism, and female authorship. These periods are: 1780s; 1890s; 1970s; Now. In a period of precarity for practitioners of both journalism and literary studies, this study looks to the late eighteenth century, and specifically to reportage of the French revolution, for a pre-history of the interdisciplinary form of literary journalism. In its veneration of both truth and form, literary journalism embodies the dualism of critique and creativity so essential to the relationship between Enlightenment and Romantic ideologies.

Email: elizabeth.mclean@unimelb.edu.au

Professor Ian McLean
Professor Ian McLean

Professor Ian McLean

Hugh Ramsay Chair of Australian Art History, The University of Melbourne

Ian McLean has published extensively on Australian art and particularly Indigenous art. Since the late eighteenth century the Australian colonies have been a privileged site of Enlightenment endeavours in science, art and literature – as Bernard Smith convincingly discussed in European Vision and the South Pacific (1960). As a student of Smith, Ian’s research has consistently explored the shadow of the Enlightenment in Australia and its histories.

Email: i.mclean@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Marc Mierowsky
Dr Marc Mierowsky

Dr Marc Mierowsky

McKenzie Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Marc Mierowsky’s research ranges broadly across period and genre, but is unified by the drive to investigate questions of collective identity and uncover the cultural dimensions of citizenship. He is one of the editors of Daniel Defoe’s Correspondence (along with Nicholas Seager and Andreas Mueller) forthcoming with Cambridge University Press, and editor (along with Nicholas Seager) of Defoe’s Roxana, forthcoming with Oxford World’s Classics. His interest in Enlightenment thought and literature coheres around questions of sovereignty, naturalisation and constitutionality, the emergence of common-sense philosophy and theories of intersubjectivity. He is currently working on two discrete but overlapping projects: a narrative history of the group of spies whose work helped bring Scotland into an incorporated Union with England in 1707 and a cultural history of naturalisation in Britain and the Australian colonies. In recent work he has focused on the enlightenments of Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Haskalah (or Jewish Enlightenment) and its influence on contemporary literature, ethics and stand-up comedy.

Email: marc.mierowsky@unimelb.edu.au

Professor Jennifer Milam
Professor Jennifer Milam

Professor Jennifer Milam

Research Associate, Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture Research Unit, Faculty of Arts, The University of Melbourne; Pro Vice-Chancellor Academic Excellence, The University of Newcastle, Australia

Jennifer Milam's research interests focus on understanding how the visual arts during the eighteenth century expressed philosophical ideas that rivalled the exposition of Enlightenment concepts in texts. Arguably what changed from the mid-eighteenth century onwards was broader exposure to 'big ideas' in visual form. Enlightenment ideas enjoyed wider circulation and cultural uptake through public exhibitions of art works that engaged audiences in interpretive response to aspects of the Enlightenment project. As a former Co-Director of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture Research Unit (ERCC), Milam used her expertise in exactly this area to provide input into the research program of the ERCC by keeping this aspect of the Enlightenment in focus and elaborating upon its legacy in the contemporary culture sector.

Email: jennifer.milam@newcastle.edu.au

Dr Sonja Molnar
Dr Sonja Molnar

Dr Sonja Molnar

Lecturer in Media and Communications, The University of Melbourne

Sonja Molnar received her PhD in English Applied Linguistics from the University of Salzburg, where she taught courses on media discourse for six years. Thereafter she was a postdoctoral research assistant at the Vienna University of Economics and Business. Her main research areas include advertising discourse, sustainability communications, multimodality, and media linguistics. Her doctoral dissertation, which explores the verbal and visual changes in British, American and Australian print advertisements from the late seventeenth century to the present, will be published as part of the series Routledge Studies in Multimodality in 2021. Her current research project examines how environmental news is communicated in the mainstream media.

Email: sonja.molnar@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Philip Pond
Dr Philip Pond

Dr Philip Pond

Lecturer in Digital Media Research Methods, The University of Melbourne

Philip Pond specialises in the study of software systems and their influence on the production of meaning, especially in politics. He is lead investigator on a Special Research Initiative investigating the relationship between between digital media and tendency for conversations to become extreme quickly and, more broadly, he investigates the relationship between digital speed and destabilising communication. He is author of two books. Digital Media and Making of Network Temporality (2021) explains how time can be reconfigured in digital systems with disruptive consequences. Complexity, Digital Media and Post-Truth Politics (2020) proposes a framework for studying destabilising interactions between the digital and political systems.

Email: ppond@unimelb.edu.au

Associate Professor John Rundell
Associate Professor John Rundell

Associate Professor John Rundell

Principal Fellow, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne and Adjunct Professor in Philosophy, La Trobe University, Melbourne

John Rundell’s research focuses on the problems of the imagination, creativity and modernity. As ERCC Research Fellow he is especially interested in the themes of ‘Critique, Creativity, Comparison’ and ‘Worldiness, Cosmopolitanism, Globalisation’. His publications include Origins of Modernity; Imaginaries of Modernity; Aesthetics and Modernity Essays by Agnes Heller; Rethinking Imagination (with Gillian Robinson); Blurred Boundaries(with Rainer Bauboeck), and ‘Creating Social Theory: Enlightenment, Romanticism, Revolution’ in The Handbook for Social Theory edited by George Ritzer and Barry Smart. He is currently completing a book on the work of Immanuel Kant entitled Kant and Critical Theories before turning to another entitled The Creative Imagination: From Kant to Castoriadis and Beyond.

Email: johnfr@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Thomas Vranken
Dr Thomas Vranken

Dr Thomas Vranken

Killam Postdoctoral Research Fellow, The University of British Columbia

Thomas Vranken’s research explores nineteenth-century literature’s relationship with automata and automation more broadly. He is currently coediting a collection of essays (Living Automata: Mechanism and Automatism in Victorian Culture) and working on a second monograph (Writing Machines: Experiments with Literary Form in the Second Industrial Revolution). His first monograph examined nineteenth-century periodical culture (Literary Experiments in Magazine Publishing: Beyond Serialisation, Routledge 2020). He completed his PhD at the University of Melbourne.

Email: thomas.vranken@ubc.ca

Professor Angela Ndalianis
Professor Angela Ndalianis

Professor Angela Ndalianis

Director, Centre for Transformative Media Technologies, Swinburne University of Technology

Angela Ndalianis is a Research Professor of Media and Entertainment, and Director of the Centre for Transformative Media Technologies at Swinburne University of Technology. Her research takes an interdisciplinary approach to entertainment media technologies, their histories and how they mediate our experience of the world – on embodiment, the senses and perception. Her publications include Neo-Baroque Aesthetics and Contemporary Entertainment (2004), Science Fiction Experiences (2010), The Horror Sensorium: Media and the Senses (2012); and the edited books – The Contemporary Comic Book Superhero (2009); Neo-baroques: From Latin America to the Hollywood Blockbuster (co-edited, 2016); Fans and Videogames: Histories, Fandom, Archives (co-edited, 2017), and The Superhero Symbol (co-edited, 2019).

Email: andalianis@swin.edu.au

Dr Miranda Stanyon
Dr Miranda Stanyon

Dr Miranda Stanyon

ARC DECRA Research Fellow, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne

Miranda Stanyon’s research focuses on enlightenment and Romantic era literature in Britain and Germany and takes a comparative approach to aesthetics, as a key field in constructing the post-enlightenment human subject and configuring its relationships with nature. She has published on the sublime, music and sound, emotions history, and visual culture.

Email: stanyonm@unimelb.edu.au

Dr Phil Habil Jennifer Wawrzinek
Dr Phil Habil
Jennifer Wawrzinek

Dr Phil Habil Jennifer Wawrzinek

Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin

Jennifer Wawrzinek’s research focuses on the intersections between the political and the ethical in literature and culture of the Romantic and post-Romantic eras. She recently completed a monograph entitled Beyond Identity: Romanticism and Decreation, which investigates modes of decreation in British Romanticism as a response to the political and ethical crises of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. Jennifer is currently editing, together with Lisa O’Connell (UQ), a special issue of the journal Postcolonial Studies which will investigate the ways in which global movements and colonial contact in the long eighteenth century can be seen to have transformed or reinvented European literature and culture of the period. She is currently developing a new research project which aims to investigate Romantic models of relationality in which (human) being is conceived as embedded within a world that is not only biological, but techno-ecological as well. This project is particularly interested in the human-animal-machine formations of William Blake.

Email: j.wawrzinek@fu-berlin.de