Graduate researchers

Corey Cribb

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Corey Cribb

PhD candidate in Screen and Cultural Studies, School of Culture and Communication, the University of Melbourne

Corey Cribb specialises in film theory and the continental philosophy of film. Focusing on the film-philosophies of Gilles Deleuze and Jean-Luc Nancy, his research considers the potential of modern cinema to perpetuate the non-mediated transformation of the world and occasion the ontological renewal of thought, bodies and ways of being-in-the-world. In part, this involves a consideration of the palpable influence of Maurice Blanchot’s literary ontology upon these thinkers, and the subsequent question of why Deleuze and Nancy maintain that the marked passivity (or worklessness) of modern cinema harbours unprecedented potential for ontological change and the restoration of belief in a world from which we are said to be absent. Beyond the notion of worklessness as "the most essential - the most romantic and the most modern - gesture in romanticism" (Watt, 2017, pp. 18), Corey's research connects with the concerns of the ERCC by seeking to show how some of the most ground breaking developments in film theory today bear the influence of debates which can be traced back to German Idealism.

Email: ccribb@student.unimelb.edu.au

Todd Dearing

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Todd Dearing

PhD candidate in English Literature, Flinders University, Adelaide

Todd Dearing’s work focuses on Romantic ideas of the human and conceptions of imagination, creativity, and genius. He explores how these ideas impact upon contemporary literary criticism and contemporary ideas of the human. He is currently completing his doctorate thesis on the trope of the daimon in William Blake's magnum opus, Jerusalem: The Emanation of the Giant Albion, read as an allegory for literary practice. His broader research interests include English and German Romantic literature, art, and philosophy, (post)humanism, contemporary literary criticism, poetry, mythopoeia, and the links between psychology and literature.Todd is interested in the ERCC themes 'Creativity, Critique, Comparison' and 'Actual, Mixed, and Virtual Realities', and the ERCC research projects 'Critique, Creativity, Innovation', 'William Blake and the History of Imagination', and 'Gothic Fictions'.

Email: todd.dearing@flinders.edu.au

Francesca Kavanagh

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Francesca Kavanagh

PhD candidate in English and Theatre Studies, School of Culture and Communication, the University of Melbourne

Francesca Kavanagh specialises in eighteenth and nineteenth-century women’s reading and writing practices with a focus on material culture. She is also interested in the gothic and cultures of celebrity and fandom from Romanticism to the present. Her current project examines practices of letter-writing, annotation, and commonplacing from a range of women writers throughout the long eighteenth century and pairs this archival material with fictional accounts of these practices by Samuel Richardson and Jane Austen to elucidate the ways in which women in the long eighteenth-century used these textual practices in the production of textual and virtual spaces of intimacy. She currently has a journal article forthcoming in The Australasian Journal of Victorian Studies entitled "'Marianne Knight | Godmersham Park': Inscription as Community Interface in the Books of Jane Austen's Niece". She is interested in a number of the ERCC's current themes, including Actual Mixed and Virtual Realities and Worldliness, Cosmopolitanism, Globalisation, as well as opportunities for future collaborations.

Email: f.kavanagh@student.unimelb.edu.au

Tarek Makhlouf

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Tarek Makhlouf

PhD candidate in Arabic, Asia Institute, the University of Melbourne

Tarek researches the content and context of traditions of philology with a particular emphasis on the Arabic tradition. Philology here is used in the traditional sense of studying texts and thus encompasses a broad array of activities including grammar, codicology, hermeneutics (in its broad meaning), literary criticism, and history. Tarek reads these philological works embedded in their socio-intellectual context, often revealing counter-intuitive results. His current project investigates the flow of Arabic philological learning from Islamic Spain to Egypt and the Levant in the 13th and 14th centuries. While maintaining his interest in the breadth of the ERCC’s themes and activities, Tarek is focused on two themes: 'Non-European Enlightenments and Romanticisms' and 'Worldliness, Cosmopolitanism, Globalisation'. He is also currently working with ERCC researchers to put together a seminar series on Islamic Enlightenments.

Email: tarekm@student.unimelb.edu.au

Belinda Scerri

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Belinda Scerri

PhD Candidate in Art History, School of Culture and Communication, the University of Melbourne

Belinda Scerri's research explores French Rococo interior ornament, patronage and the ascendancy of ornémaniste artists in early eighteenth-century Paris. Her broader research interests include: the South Sea Bubble, Système Law and economic collapse of 1720 through an art historical lens; early modern collecting and commissioning cultures; mercantilism and the establishment of Royal manufactories; exoticism and cosmopolitanism in French Régence art and architecture. She is a founding member of the Centre of Visual Art (CoVA) doctoral academy and a 2019/2020 research fellow at the UCLA Center for Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Studies. She is currently writing a book chapter entitled '"Instructing herself by fad or fancy": Depictions and Fictions of Female Connoisseurs in Eighteenth-century Paris' which will appear in Portraits & Poses: Representations of Female Intellectual Authority, Agency and Authorship in Early Modern and Enlightenment Europe (Leuven and Cornell UP, 2020).

Email: bscerri@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

Samuel Watts

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Samuel Watts

PhD candidate and Teaching Associate, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, the University of Melbourne

Samuel Watts researches and writes about the experiences of African Americans in the Deep South during Reconstruction. His focus is on how formerly enslaved people interpreted ideas of freedom and citizenship in violently contested urban spaces, while working to construct and maintain lasting communities and networks. Additionally, Samuel is broadly interested in the historical legacies of racial discourse in the US, Australia and beyond. He currently has a book chapter in peer-review, entitled: “Reconstruction Justice: African American Police Officers in Charleston and New Orleans,” in Freedom’s Gained and Lost: Reinterpreting Reconstruction in the Atlantic World, eds. Simon Lewis and Adam Domby (New York: Fordham University Press, 2019 - forthcoming). He is interested in a number of ERCC projects, most notably those focused on slavery, and has an ongoing interest in the legacies of Enlightenment thought in debates about race, citizenship and revolution.

Email: sjwatts@student.unimelb.edu.au